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  1. Good evening and thanks for all the work you put in here. I was looking at the piece below and was wondering if you had any thoughts. Not enough info for me to make a decision unfortunately so wondering if there is anything you could add here. It is maker marked however. I was mostly concerned with how fresh the paint appeared initially.
    6 points
  2. Looking forward to seeing what you found out from your research, thanks for posting.
    5 points
  3. Here are two photos showing the two sides of the label. As I mentioned in my earlier post, I am currently researching the claims made and I am only half way through the process- some of them stack up, however, at present, I can’t find any record of an MC awarded to 2nd Lt Ashley.
    5 points
  4. Here’s my Luger - 1915 DWM manufactured - all matching numbers complete with hard leather case dated 1916 and two WW1 issue magazines. The Luger has an interesting story behind it which I am researching at the minute and will comment further on when I’ve verified the facts. However, as it stands, it’s a lovely Luger, in great condition, which may or may not be related directly to Passchendaele.
    5 points
  5. Here is a Steyr-Mannlicher model 1895 made for the Dutch, who named it the Geweer M. 95, it is commonly known today as the Dutch M95. This was the main service rifle from 1895 to 1940, and was produced under license by Steyr until the Dutch facilities were up and running in 1904, after wards the rifles have the marking "Hembrug" instead of "Steyr". Although the Dutch did not fight in WW1, they certainly prepared for it by modernizing their forces with new rifles and carbines, and it was not until WW2 that these rifles saw action. Like other M95 type rifles, this one utilized the En Bloc clip in which the empty clip would fall out of the bottom of the magazine well once used up. The rifle used the rimmed 6.5x53.5 cartridge, similar to the Romanian models. There were several models of the long rifle produced and numerous models of carbines. This particular rifle was produced in 1915 at Hembrug and has the accompanying bayonet. After the Germans occupied the country, a lot of these rifles were used in rear areas and on the Atlantic wall. I do have to add the rifle has a really smooth action, its well made and robust.
    5 points
  6. Fantastic rifle. Great photos. I love that long rifle. They are always more difficult to find. A look at some M95s in carbine form: Forgotten Weapons video (A Few of) The Many Faces of the Dutch M95 Carbine
    5 points
  7. Gildwiller1918: Hello. Thank you for sharing your recent acquisition of Red Knight of Germany with the Forum, excellent find. Given your new addition to your collection is almost 100 years old, the book is in very good condition. Once again, thank you for sharing with us. Best regards, John R.
    5 points
  8. Pictured from my collection is a magazine. I apologize in advance for the reflection in the image of this magazine. On the cover of this magazine is a photographs of the crewmen of the U-47 commanded by Gunther Prien being celebrated after the sinking of of the British battleship HMS Royal Oak in Scapa Flow on 14 October 1939, with a loss of 833 lives. Scapa Flow was the home anchorage for the British Navy. This magazine is filled with pictures of the commander and crew of U-47 upon their return to Germany. Gunther Prien was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross, which made him the first U-Boat Commander to receive this honor. For further information go to the following link: http://donhollway.com/scapaflow/index.html.
    5 points
  9. Pictured from my collection is a booklet (top) and postcard (bottom). The booklet provides information about submarine and service in the Kriegsmarine. The postcard contains the Kreigsmarine Standard over a U-boot. I apologize for the reflection in images. Prior to archiving this booklet (top) many years ago, I took a picture of the front/back covers folded out, fantastic art work.
    5 points
  10. All: The next three posts will provide a few of the many examples of propaganda in my Kriegsmarine collection. Booklets, magazines, postcards, and other forms of propaganda were provided to glorify Germany's naval exploits, encourage recruitment, and lift moral to further an agenda. Note that I take care to archive/protect all pieces in my collection, especially paper and cloth. Please do not post any written response/comment on this thread until I have completed the next three post, thank you. Best regards, John R.
    5 points
  11. Hello everyone! Yank living in Germany with a question for European toy soldier experts. I've purchased several metal miniatures at museum gift shops and local toy stores in Vienna and Prague. They come with no box or paperwork. The only identifying mark is on the base. Can anyone tell me the manufacturer? Best Regards, Jacob
    4 points
  12. Nice medal. It would be very hard to fake those characteristic age 'bubbles' under the finish. Tony
    4 points
  13. Germans posing with captured French equipment, the FT-17 tank and Mle 1914 Hotchkiss Machine gun.
    4 points
  14. Could you make a detailed photo of the text on the card attached?
    4 points
  15. Very nice pistol, I have a 1918 dated one myself, however mine was made at Erfurt
    4 points
  16. Personally I would be very wary of this armband Eddie, these type of things are very hard to prove either way as no one has really studied them in detail. There are allot of similar items coming out of Eastern Europe, it might be OK but it's also really easy to fake.
    4 points
  17. Just got this in, apparently a small cache of November 1944 dated crates full of coffee cans were recently found, I picked one up before they are all gone. Full and complete rations are getting hard to find today.
    4 points
  18. Thanks USMC, I have my eye on the Carbine, 3rd down in your post. I have a bid on it, hopefully I win that one. A collector would stay quite busy trying to get all the variants of the M95
    4 points
  19. Good thinking, dependent on the paint used, it could be easy or hard, I once cleaned one off that I thought would be difficult, but it was a water based paint and came off very easily. Good luck!
    4 points
  20. I might try some paint stripper on a small area of the inside rim to see how easy the black paint will come off first.
    4 points
  21. Up to you Leon, I would personally restore to its original look, but that is my opinion.
    4 points
  22. Here's a MKII South African helmet shell made by TSP=Transvaal Steel Pressing Syndicate Ltd of Johnnesburg, I found on a Saturday Market last weekend, cost me all of £8. I'm in two minds, do I strip it back to its original colour which you can still see inside, or just leave it black as a home front civil defence helmet and add a new reproduction liner? I doubt I could find a used original Jager Rand liner for it now?
    4 points
  23. Hello Adrian, they say if you do not ask you do not get and so I am making a cheeky request. I am an archivist for the Massey Shaw Fireboat ( lots of info on our website if you do not already know about us) and I wondered if you would consider donating a signed copy to our small library. We maybe able to generate some sales for you at our various events, but unfortunately all our funds are dedicated to getting the boat ready for her return to Dunkirk. Yours sincerely, Firemalc
    4 points
  24. Commentary about the WWI silent film. I would like to again highlight the activities shown in this Reel American silent 10 min. film. What a difference from the way an archaelogist in America would approach such work: As a contrast see current approaches (NOT WWI), but still a rare find that required a scientific approach: There are many other University examples... I post this one because it is interesting and in Europe. Enjoy Incredibly Rare Battle Of Waterloo Skeleton Uncovered OCTOBER 31, 2017 | PART OF REEL AMERICA: GRAVES REGISTRATION SERVICE U.S. ARMY SILENT FILM Reel America Graves Registration Service U.S. Army Silent Film To listen to the lecture and comments. https://www.c-span.org/video/?445390-4/graves-registration-service-us-army-silent-film Also very interesting... QUOTE: Reel America Chateau-Thierry Sector U.S. Army Silent Film Historian Mitchell Yockelson and French World War I battlefield guide Guillaume Moizan provided commentary for silent U.S. Army Signal Corps films from 1918. Restored by the National Archives, the film shows activity related to battles in the spring and early summer of 1918 when American and French forces stopped a German offensive northeast of Paris. https://www.c-span.org/video/?445390-3/chateau-thierry-sector-us-army-silent-film --------------------------------------- One of my favorite WW I documentaries I use to show my archaeology class was the program "Digging Up The Trenches (WWI Documentary)" QUOTE In Flanders Fields, Belgium, a team of archaeologists seek to uncover the secrets of World War One by finding and excavating a German and a British trench. Digging up the Trenches is a two-hour special that reveals each stage of trench warfare by focusing on the remarkable finds made by this unique excavation. For a great archaeological perspective to recovering WW I artifacts please view this one and a half hour TV program: Some may enjoy the 2014 book by David Kenyon and Andrew Robertshaw, Digging the Trenches: The Archaeology of the Western Front or : Traces of War: The Archaeology of the First World War , 2018 by Birger Stichelbaut also for general survey, a text: The Historical Archaeology of Military Sites: Method and Topic by Clarence Raymond Geier, Lawrence E. Babits, et al. | Dec 15, 2010
    4 points
  25. Found another image of this grenade in use by Russian soldiers
    4 points
  26. Welcome to the forum Tommy1418, it looks like Hadfield changed to the HS stamp mark round about 1916 when the new improvements were added.
    4 points
  27. A very common set of approximately 20 post cards was produced in 1918 by the Chicago Daily Newspaper. These are easily found. Due to a somewhat thick coat of print, they have a tendency to crack with age and heat. These are divided back, somewhat dark black and white lithographed post cards. On the front is a title and the circular Chicago News WAR postcard circular imprint and on the reverse is written “THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS, G.J. KAVANAUGH, WAR POSTAL CARD DEPARTMENT” What is difficult to find is the entire set in its original post card folder ! Most of the ones that are actually post marked date to late 1918 or 1919. There are two Belleau Wood scenes. Groups of cards are always for sale on Flee bay. Here is a sample showing some cards in the set. Photo source is an on line grab. It is difficult to find these thick cards in good condition. The surface has a tendency to crack. I do favor stamped and post marked used cards that were actually sent in the mail. Others like unused mint cards.
    4 points
  28. In the U.S. , WW I stereoview cards from the Keystone View Co. and Underwood and Underwood are fairly common and can be found somewhat easily. Finding cards in great condition is always a problem, they were not always stored under the best conditions. All to many were religated to the damp basement or hot attic. Specimens in excellent condition with the great photo subjects are always expensive. In contrast, one rarely encounters Realistic Travels and W. E. Troutman Inc. stereoscopic cards. And finding one in great condition with the WW I subject matter you are looking for is difficult. I was lucky and found some Belleau Wood cards over the holidays that no one bid on. Here they are : W.E. Troutman Card 5131 is of german POWs captured at Belleau Wood. W. E. Troutman card 5009 presents an early 1920s view of Belleau Wood cemetery Less exciting is stereoscopic card 5033 showing the destroyed village of Belleau Wood. Then there are a few post cards that show small groups of burials or individual burials from after the battle. These were later relocated to the main cemeteries: German, American, and French. I have showed the burials near the Hunter Lodge. Here are some views found on post cards. Finally I got a nice reproduction of a map:
    4 points
  29. Looks like a good Gustav Brehmer maker marked 13, this is the first type, later crosses by Gustav Brehmer had the swastika on a slight pedestal.
    4 points
  30. Does anyone know when Hadfield changed the H/S to HS stamp or did they alternate between the two
    4 points
  31. I do not own a Ross. This is what a normal blade looks like : see Gildwiller 1918 this is a M1905 Ross version. Also found in Bayonets by Janzen on page 25 and 26, the author refers to the modified Ross cut down bayonet on the top of page 26. He refers to these as cut down trench fighting knifes done by soldiers and also military modifications. The blade shape of your specimen is very identical to the drawing of a modified Ross trench knife Number 1 at the top left corner of page 26. It appears to be a military modification due to the exact shape of the blades. Also the guard has been ground sort of curved and this attribute is shown in the Jensen example just like yours. Not some farm boy cut. Some military bayonets with the nornal shape of the guard and bayonet ring still present were cut down by soldiers, but the guard was not modified. A easy to find source is Bayonets of the First World War by Schiffer publications. The authors are Bera & Aubry. Its value is the fantastic photos. No photos of the fighting knife are shown on page 44, but some nice photos of different normal Ross bayonets are shown. On the Ross, the bayonet tip was not the best shape so soldiers commonly sharpened them to have a better pointed tip. The Schiffer book shows the M 1905 and 1910 form of the Ross bayonet. Also reference Kiesling, Bayonets of the World, Vol III pg 50. Both references( Janzen and Kiesling are rather expensive books, get or see them at the University library. There is a new book out on Ross bayonets: it is hard cover and 68 pages. Mine has not arrived. So my guess, it is not an example of a farm boy chop job, rather a military/factory cut down modified fighting knife. The blade shape is somewhat similar to the Marine Ka Bar. Both the guard and blade shape have been modified on your specimen to factory specs as shown in Janzen:26. It is a Ross fighting knife. The Ross Bayonet: A Canadian bayonet for a Canadian rifle by Derek Complain April 8, 2022
    4 points
  32. Gildwiller1918: Hello. Thank you for the compliment regarding the items I shared with the Forum and you from my collection of Kriegsmarine antiques. Have a great day and thank you once again for the kind words. Best regards, John R.
    4 points
  33. Great items! Thank you for posting, you certainly have a very impressive collection.
    4 points
  34. I have expanded my comments on the first EK here with much engraving. This must be an extremely valuable piece.
    4 points
  35. All: Thank you for not posting while I added the last three post. I am done, you can now post on this thread. Once again, thank you for your support and patients. Best regards, John R.
    4 points
  36. Pictured from my collection is a book. This book is a short story of the exploit of the crew and Commander, Otto Schuhart, of U-29 sinking of the Royal Navy's aircraft HMS Courageous on 17 September 1939, 519 soles lost. The HMS Courageous was the first British warship sunk in World War II. Like most German propaganda during the Second World War, this book has excellent cover art. I apologize for the reflection in images. For further information go to the following link to watch a video: https://www.google.com/search?q=sinking+of+hms+courageous&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS992US996&oq=sinking+of+HMS+courageous&aqs=chrome.0.0i512j0i22i30j0i390l4.17950j1j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#fpstate=ive&vld=cid:c9709f17,vid:nJtYMTCf4JM
    4 points
  37. Thanks Fritz, I think I will do that while they are still easy to find, and affordable.
    4 points
  38. You should get the other well known works on him, still easy to find.
    4 points
  39. Hi Paul, again this Iron cross appears to be a post war Souval. However as I have said before the jury is still out on these crosses as Souval certainly made them during the war, the retainer is the thing which collectors can not agree. The wire type retainers are agreed to be wartime but the type you have posted is considered to be post war, some collectors believe them to be war time. Up until now no definitive answer is known. I don't doubt for a moment your uncle brought it back from the war as even the post war Souvals were produced just after the war. You are correct the clasp does not belong in the box and would be issued in it's own presentation box.
    4 points
  40. Just added the fuze. Quite a piece by itself.
    3 points
  41. Please see this link for the story and some great photos. Talk about history- I just had to repost this. https://www.k98kforum.com/threads/german-captured-1915-mosin-nagant.44190/ A view of a rather rare find, A German capture M91 1915 dated Mosin with the German capture stamp on the stock. How lucky can a person get? Here are three photos from the above source:
    3 points
  42. There is nothing special about the Wehrpass.. he enlisted in 1939 at aged 19 and was KIA on the Eastern front at 21 in 1941. No awards other than General Assault Badge (posthumous) and was in 39 Panzer Korp. The interesting thing is the Notice of Death Cert signed by the unit commander but some 2year later. The small collection comes with newspaper cutting of his Death Card dated 1941 and a translation of his Wehrpass. Just wondering what peoples thoughts are on an overall price before I overspend haha.
    3 points
  43. That looks excellent , perhaps you could find a second hand version of the Blu ray cheaper, I only have it on DVD. I've also re-added "Stalingrad: Dogs, Do You Want to Live Forever?" to the top of the post, watch it before it disappears again.
    3 points
  44. Hi All I’d appreciate peoples thoughts on this- real or not? Many thanks E
    3 points
  45. Odd the vhs says 97 min, but the different cover DVD say 150 min. Now I got to watch both. One has to be a cut version.
    3 points
  46. Hi Fritz, these are fakes coming out of Poland as you say. Loads of them about usually have photos of famous panzer, SS and Luftwaffe aces with lots of odd stamps and pictures on them, total garbage I'm afraid.
    3 points
  47. The British Expeditionary Force that deployed to France between September 1939 and April 1940 was the first fully mechanised army to go to war and not rely on horse drawn transport. They took a staggering 68,618 vehicles of all types to France and what's even more staggering is 63,879 of them were either destroyed, disabled or captured by the time the British Army had left France in June 1940. The last British and French soldiers at Dunkirk surrender under the white flag at Fort Mardyck. 4th June 1940.
    3 points
  48. New Addition to the collection, a 1927 print of the Red Knight of Germany. 373 pages.
    3 points
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