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  1. This is a Mk14 bombsight, it’s been refurbished post war though as it has the ferranti gyro fitted to it.
    6 points
  2. Here is a WW1 era Turkish Grenade, the 1914 No. 2 model. It was a cast iron body with a brass fuse. It had a inscription on the side which translated to "type 2 infantry grenade". Additionally it had a notch on the grenade body to allow for a ring to used to attach to equipment. Like most other Central Powers nations, they relied on Germany to supply their needs, pretty much from 1915 onwards, the Turks were supplied with German made or captured arms and equipment. These No.2 grenades are an interesting and unique model. I have had one on my wish list for some time.
    5 points
  3. I know we have focused on Germany, France, England and the US as well as others for WW1 era Grenades, but I thought I would post some information about grenades made and used by the Bulgarians in the great war. One of these was called the Odrin Grenade, which was designed by Col. Simeon Dobrevski, which was an improvement on the older Makedonia model introduced in 1906.It was ball shaped, looking like a French ball grenade but with the fragmentation exterior of a Turkish grenade. It was put into service in 1915 and remained so until the wars end. The body was cast iron, and usually painted bl
    5 points
  4. During WW2, the allies used various forms of deception against its enemies, one of the most famous was Operation Fortitude which was a huge campaign to mislead the Germans about the invasion of France in the summer of 1944. The idea was to let the enemy think the allies would cross at the shortest crossing, by the Pas de Calais, instead of Normandy. So huge fields of inflatable and wooden armored vehicles and fakes airfields with fake planes were poured into southeast England and enemy aircraft were allowed to photograph them. To make the information even more turned spies validated this
    5 points
  5. Nice set, I only have this. Think it’s a tin opener.
    5 points
  6. Here is a WW1 era Italian SIPE grenade, SIPE is an acronym for Societa Italiana Prodotti Esplondenti a company that made explosives and ordinance for the military. However, not much else is known about these grenades. There are several variants to the body shape and manufacture but they all look fairly close alike, the fuses are another matter. Most encountered today are missing the fuse or only have a partial fuse. Most were made from zinc, lead, or brass. Some of these were percussion in operation, similar to French versions, others you had to remove the cap and light the fuse manually
    5 points
  7. Nice job on the fuse resto. I managed to land a SIPE the other day with a fuse of sorts so I was happy to find it
    5 points
  8. More stuff here. https://nfknowledge.org/contributions/millersford-arde-superintendent-the-lancaster-crash-and-an-unrecognised-hero/#map=10/-1.7/50.96/0/24:0:0.6|39:1:1|40:1:1 My late FIL assured me that he witnessed the crash, caused by the last in line of a group of low flying Lancasters of the Dam Buster Squadron losing control in the turbulent slipstream and turning left into clear air, the pilot then had to steepen the turn to avoid a line of electricity pylons, unfortunately he clipped the ground with his port wingtip and cartwheeled. Crew very lucky to survive.
    5 points
  9. Hi Another story from my late FIL: Sometime around 1943 he helped to test & evaluate the Bren Gun (Mk2 or mk3 perhaps?) It was duly fixed firmly down on a special mount and a full mag was fired on auto at a target, either 100 or 200 yards, I can't remember which. When the target was examined to see what grouping was achieved they were surprised to see only one bullet hole, the rest appeared to have missed. Someone then commented that there was something strange about the hole, sort of slightly enlarged, it was then realised that all the bullets had gone through the same ho
    5 points
  10. Wouldn’t fancy trying them now though! Lol
    5 points
  11. Hi, Could anyone give me any info on these razors please? I’ve found a bit of info on the Rolls Razor, but not the others. Thanks, Steve.
    5 points
  12. Nice items, food/ration items are hard to come by.
    5 points
  13. I have one of these also, didn’t know about the lens release though. I also have the aiming rectical too.
    5 points
  14. My father recently handed me his collection. Amongst it was this Lincolnshire Home Guard jacket and Lincolnshire Cadet force jacket. I would appreciate any information on the cadet force as I can’t seem to find much out about them in war time. Thanks. Steve.
    5 points
  15. I don’t have that much US stuff, just these items.
    5 points
  16. Hi, I found these in my stash. Not sure if they are from motorcycle or other vehicle?
    4 points
  17. I'm not surprised, they are very hard to come by. They do pop up every so often on UK vendor sites. Keep your eyes peeled!
    4 points
  18. Not come across these grenades. More ordinance for the list.
    4 points
  19. As Bulgaria was part of the Central Powers during the Great War, it could draw on resources from its partner nations, such as Germany which provided weapons and field gear. Bulgaria also supplied the above mentioned grenades to Turkey. Bulgaria used the German stick type grenades, which can be seen in many photographs. Information on Bulgaria's munition productions is scarce as well as photos of ordnance. I did find that during the Balkan wars, there was a good abundance of grenades available to Bulgarian forces, however in 1915, only a few thousand grenades were available, which tends to supp
    4 points
  20. Here is the Makedonia grenade which was introduced in 1906, which was widely used in the Balkan Wars in 1912-1913. The grenade had a threaded opening for a brass or cast iron plug with knurled bands. Initially, the fuse was a match type which ran through the center of the plug, but was updated in 1911. After the Ordin grenade was introduced, the Makedonia grenades was also fitted with this fuse. The grenade was 72mm in diameter and weighed about 750 grams. Photo source: internet
    4 points
  21. Hi, Thought I’d share my long coat with you all.
    4 points
  22. The photo studio in Wandsbek, long closed is clearing out, times have changed. I was given these pictures yesterday. The poster at the top centre states - So flogen wir damals - und so fliegen wir heute - VARIG, 1927-1987, apparently a Brasilian Airline. The topic here is aviation. Wandsbek had an airfield from shortly before World War 1 till the mid 1930s. A zeppelin is also recorded as passing over Wandsbek, here the industry park with the cocoa and chocolate factory in the Neumann-Reichhardt-Straße, now run by Nestlé. One photo also shows Adolf Galland.
    4 points
  23. Great find on the SIPE, it is really hard to find them with fuses intact, as most are dug examples.
    4 points
  24. My 1928A1 model which was manufactured in 1942 with 100 round C Drum 50 Round L Drum & 20 round stick mag. Repro 1921 Colt Era Wood set. Note the large front grip so in essence this weapon has the look of a 1921 Thompson. 1921 deactivated Thompsons are upward of £10k so I cloned my 1942. C Drum loaded with 100 inert rounds I have a passion for gangsters of the roaring 20's. My tribute to John Dillinger My extensive Thompson magazine collection. Numerous manufacturers. The oldest being manufactured in 1921 known to collectors as a 'Colt
    4 points
  25. Here's a reproduced pocket book Information for American Servicemen coming to Britain in 1942, I've scanned several pages makes interesting reading.
    4 points
  26. Nice magazines, do you have the Thompson drum as well? I understand the governments concerns in some cases, other times it seems a little carried away. I do however like the Thompsons, they are very heavy and robust, but they were designed towards the end of WW1 to be trench clearers.
    4 points
  27. Nice looking helmet Kievit, thanks for posting the photo's.
    4 points
  28. Hi, another US M1917 that I found in the Netherlands. It came from a scrap metal sale. The liner is MvO stamped (Dutch war ministry), which would date it's use to around mid-late 50ies. Probably used with a Disaster Relief unit of the Army or Civil Defense. The manufacturer stamp is ZC223, although the 3 is hard to read. Rgds Clement
    4 points
  29. Nice option to have the conversion option to a functional weapon (depending on state law) One of the big plusses for a weapons collector living in the states! Personally I'm not a fan of the Mk3 with its cast barrel shroud (that's the only way I can describe it) I've held one and it feels & looks cheap compared to my Mk2 & Mk5. However from a collecting perspective it would be nice to have one. Budget constraints dictate that I have to choose my SMG purchases 'carefully' but I do have a nice old spec Thompson M1 coming my way to compliment my 1928A1. That'll give me 5 SMGS; 2
    4 points
  30. I have seen a lot of Mk 3's in the US lately, even have companies that make new receiver tubes to restore to semi-auto firing, or full-auto, depending on your license and state requirements. I might have to pick one up soon for the collection.
    4 points
  31. Hi Chris thats a really interesting recollection of events. Sten gun magazines could hold 32 rounds but as a rule they were loaded with 28 as this would prevent jamming. There were 5 variants of the Sten gun Mk1 to Mk 5. Mk1s & 4s are hard to find. Mk2s & 3s come on the market from time to time and Mk5s are easily obtainable at this time. See photo of my Mk5 with a 7 cell bandolier that was usually associated with paratroopers and commandos.
    4 points
  32. I'm not an avid gun enthusiast but I have some info that might be of interest. My late father-in-law (1926-2010) started work in 1942-3 at a secret bomb testing site in the New Forest, England. One day the team he worked with received a Sten Gun with a request to try and find out why it was jamming (soldiers were dying in the war because of it) Part of their bomb testing was to film them exploding with high speed photography (camera was driven by an electric motor geared up via an Austin 7 gearbox!) They bolted down a Sten fitted a full magazine and fired it off. Due to sods law the
    4 points
  33. Here's a M1917 helmet stamped ZA 248 has a repo liner made by Prairie Flower Leather Co also has painted on the front of helmet a Clover and Circled 89. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  34. Not a problem, nice item by the way
    4 points
  35. Hi, I was given this by my father. Could anyone tell me what it’s for please? I’m thinking something to do with signals? Thanks, Steve.
    4 points
  36. Thank you, that’s awesome!
    4 points
  37. Nice set, distinctively different to the RAF pattern, looks a bit more grey in the photos than the usual RAF blue. If you have the right insignia and can properly stitch it on, would be ok in my opinion. What you need now is the correct headdress to match. I'm sure there are a few more on the forum, who can advise you better on this.
    4 points
  38. From my collection this a 1935 photograph of Mae West learning how to handle a Thompson 1928A1 with a 100 round C Drum attached. So the story goes Mae West was being extorted for $1000 with the threat of having acid thrown over her. Pictured here with L.A Bereau investigator Jack Chriss.
    4 points
  39. Here we have another British WW1 helmet stamped H/S 307 = Hadfield Ltd of Sheffield both ( Manufacturer & Steel Supplier ) With Heat/Batch No 307, has no liner or chinstrap. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  40. Here's a M1917 helmet stamped UC 305 still has its liner and chinstrap although not attached to chinstrap lugs. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  41. Here's a M1917 helmet stamped ZA 28 has no liner or chinstrap only wool pad remaining. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  42. Hi, I have this dog tag and I cannot for the life of me find any info about about it! I’ve contacted the Norwegian navy with no success. I think this is the bottom part of a two tag set up, but I just haven’t seen one like it anywhere else. Any help much appreciated. Steve.
    4 points
  43. Excellent, I’m sure I have a couple more, I’ll post once found
    4 points
  44. Hi, I’m new to this site, hope it’s ok to post a Zuckerman on this thread? I do have some Brodies which I will add once I liberate them from my loft! Steve.
    4 points
  45. Got this helmet for my collection but can't identificate it. It's steel, magnetic but very light. I think it's something like civil defence.
    4 points
  46. Thanks. That's why i decided to post it here. Maybe someone will identificate it.
    4 points
  47. Links were blocked, will have to search on YouTube.
    4 points
  48. Erkennungsmarke, old style, the smaller one of a pair, the larger one is missing, 8.Kompagnie / Landsturm-Infanterie-Regiment 84, No. 552, H. Wandscheider, Hamburg - still on old attachment cord, this without any national colours. It would appear that a previous inscription has been deleted, service number or unit change. Zink, ca. 1914-1916. An unusual name, only one person of that name found presently in the region of Parchim, Mecklenburg. Re-mobilised on 2. August 1914, Landwehr-Infanterie-Regiment 84 drew most of it's personnel from Schleswig-Holstein and also Hamburg, and wa
    4 points

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