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  1. I understand Fritz, but the paint was virtually gone, and was concerned about the rust. I was more interested in preservation of the helmet itself.
    5 points
  2. Should never repaint helmets. Value of an original SS helmet today around 3000 - 4000 Euros! I doubt if you will ever find an original.
    5 points
  3. Hello guys, i just found one helmet in good condition, it is the portuguese helmet used in ww1 with the original color, leather interior. It as HS 236 marked inside , is this helmet worth something? thanks everyone and stay safe.
    5 points
  4. I have over double the amount you have and I love finding the variants of the WW1 models. It just gets a little harder the more you have it seems.
    5 points
  5. Of the 40 plus WW1 grenades in my collection Austro-Hungarians are the dominant number. Always coming across another type. I find them fascinating and such a collectble 'group' I have 2 more versions of the M16 coming my way (hopefully)
    5 points
  6. Great information. From what I have been able to find, on the Austro-Hungarian grenades, there are at least 5-10 versions of each type (sometimes more), as they were made by different manufacturers. One could spend quite some time looking for all the variants for that collection.
    5 points
  7. Update and additional information. Having carried out further research I've established that there are at least 5 versions of the Austrian M16 Schnellwurfgrenate .However, currently I don't know the sequencial order of each particular model from a development, time line perspective. The version posted at the start of this thread is one of the rarer harder to find models which I'll describe as the 'long safety lever model' along with what I suspect is an even rarer version the 'Type 1' pictured above. Similar in appearance & pictured here is an example which I recently acquired & whi
    5 points
  8. Hi, I've just been sorting through my late parents' belongings and come across these two helmets and been doing some research. The one marked MB on the front I think must be earlier and maybe WWI but I'm not sure. The second with what looks like an owl on the side I assume from my research and the shape this must be WWII but again cannot find anything similar. I cannot see any marks on the helmets or the linings but both are in great condition. Would love it for anyone can give me any more information or advise where I can look. Thank you. Sue
    5 points
  9. Thank you so much for the replies. Good to have confirmation of the type of helmet which I thought but wasn't sure. There is no known link of my grandfather to poland/South Africa that I know about but of course it could have been given to him by someone else. I found some of his old papers today in my mothers' things so I'm going to take a look through and see if there is any more info on his war history. There is too the possibility that one of them is from my Dad's side and there I have no information. Classic thing of I wish I had asked more when they were alive. I did in fact ask my Mum
    5 points
  10. Great helmet and wonderful repaint. I got a repainted m40 with Normandy type camouflage that have three colours on it. The previous owner repainted it and applied some aluminum oxide powder too to make it more original but I still think it's not good enough, and the helmet itself lacks manufacturing mark, seems scratched off, but I don't doubt its authenticity. I will find a way to upload the picture because the VPN I'm using is problematic..
    4 points
  11. Greetings! I am honour to me a qualified member of this forum. Here's a brief self-introduction so that we can know each other and make friends. Gerd Wiesler is a name from a movie, not my real name. I am from Beijing, China, and I mainly concentrated on RN, KM, BM and VM. There's not a lot of people playing this in China, actually. I am a law student so maybe I could luckily meet some European law students too. Recently I am working on Volksmarine uniform and I will manage to upload some pictures of them. Thanks for reading!
    4 points
  12. Very nice! Thanks alot, you guys are very helpful i will consider to become gold member! I cannot express my gratitude, thanks!
    4 points
  13. Hi Miguel, here is a similar one for sale in the US at the moment for $229 which is about 189 Euro, hope this helps. If you want to sell it we have a classifieds section in the forum details below To sell in the Classifieds area you need to be a Gold member. Gold membership can be bought via the top menu by clicking 'Store' then 'Subscriptions' then 'Gold member' where you can pay using the shopping cart via PayPal. Gold membership costs £15 for the first year which can be renewed subsequently for £10 per year. This allows Gold members to post their items for sale for one year, with a max
    4 points
  14. Hello Miguelbernardo, what you have is the 1917/30 Model helmet. The DCT stood for "Defenca Civil Territorial", part of the Portuguese Legion. These helmets started off as WW1 British made helmets, then in 1930, they were refurbished/reissued and used until 1939, when a new model 1940 was introduced, however they were still in use for some time by the DCT and other auxiliary organizations. The green cross stood for the Cross of Aviz, used by the Legião Portuguesa or Portuguese Legion, which started in 1936, and was dissolved in the 1970's. The legion had three tiers: Escalão das Activid
    4 points
  15. There are several dealer's I know of that sometimes have the European ones, but like you said, the prices can be quite ridiculous sometimes. I do have quite a bit of vendors that I deal with and they have my want lists, which usually pay off better for me.
    4 points
  16. You do have that Shinkle though that's a love bit of kit. You do have one major dealer in the States who always has European grenades for sale. Can't mention the name of course but you'll probably know who I'm talking about. Top dollar prices though.
    4 points
  17. Honestly, I was not expecting to find this one, as European models are really rare here. But I will keep my eyes open.
    4 points
  18. Absolutely. I hadn't even come across the M16 'Cigaro' until recently. Looks likely that I'll have x3 variants in the near future.Always looking, same as yourself. Those hard to come by pieces are a treat to find
    4 points
  19. That's a nice original example Are the larger versions around Stateside?
    4 points
  20. That would be a very nice family group, father and son both with Military Medals. The Second World War Military Medal is also much scarcer as 115,000 Military Medals were awarded during the First World War compared to only 15,000 in the Second World War.
    4 points
  21. I doubt if he went to the trouble to have them privately engraved, just kept as souvenir and never worn, also had a few bringbacks from North Africa and Austria, a Dienstglas, a Beretta pistol, which later fell to pieces! some banknotes from the Reich and the occupation money notes.
    4 points
  22. I can't remember whether they were stamped or engraved. He never wore them, because they were never mounted, but still had the original box. I recently saw an example of a star, can't remember which one, I only remember it had on the reverse: W. GILL and his service number, can't remember unit. May have been a Commonwealth issue. N.B.: Spelt as "DEFENCE", see same.
    4 points
  23. It's possible he got his name engraved privately but they were never issued named. Also of interest are the Canadians, whilst their War and Defense medals were the exact same as the British they were actually made from silver rather than the British which were cupro-nickel. The Indian , South African and Australians also had there own Defense medals which were a totally different design.
    4 points
  24. Ok, thanks. I was wondering about that. I appreciate the info.
    4 points
  25. Paul British stars were never named, the only countries who named their stars were India, Australia and South Africa
    4 points
  26. I have a question on the Campaign/Star medals. How common is it for them to be named? I see a lot for sale that are just blank, with only a few named. Just curious
    4 points
  27. Pacific stars are harder to find, I can sometimes go for months without having one in stock, where as all the others are pretty much in stock most of the time. The Atlantic star is next rarest, then the Burma, then France and Germany, Africa, Italy and most common the 39-45 star.
    4 points
  28. The Luftwaffe Decal in this picture is definitely a recent application. These transfers are easily available nowadays, but well made. An original would be much aged and scratched by now.
    4 points
  29. Have just purchased this latest medal The Atlantic Star, probably the rarest of the series after the Aircrew Europe Star.
    4 points
  30. Here we have another made British helmet stamped FS 201 = Thomas Firth & Sons Ltd of Sheffield both ( Manufacturer & Steel Supplier ) with Heat/Batch No 201. Helmet in good condition still has it's liner and chinstrap. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  31. Here we have another made British WW1 helmet stamped LS 21 these marks are thought to be the Leadbeater & Scott Co of Sheffield but this has never been proven. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  32. 4 points
  33. We have not had a de-act for sale since the EU changed the laws on them, now we are out the EU that might change, however I don't think it will be a top priority for the government with everything else going on at the moment. In my personal collection I had an Mp40, Mp44, Mp43, Mg34,Mg42,K98,Luger,P38 all the classics, plus loads of others for sale in the shop including British, US and Soviet.
    4 points
  34. Here we have another British made WW1 helmet stamped D/A 81 = James Dixon & Sons Ltd of Sheffield ( Manufacturer ) and Edgar Allen & Co Ltd of Sheffield ( Steel Supplier ) and Heat/Batch No 81 of steel used. Helmet has US 91st Wild West Division emblem on front. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  35. Here we have a British made WW1 helmet stamped M/A 1 = J&J. Maxfield & Sons Ltd of Sheffield ( Manufacturer ) and Edgar Allen & Co Ltd of Sheffield ( Steel Supplier ) this has to be the first batch of steel this company produced in 1916, helmet in very good condition for it's age still has it's original liner and chin strap. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  36. I have recently learned that I am in possession of a Siamese Mauser which somehow came into my grandfather’s possession while he served during WWI. It was given to my father, and then to me. Is there any way to determine the value of this firearm. The one I have is the one with the double stock. I suppose for its age it is in relatively good condition, but I am no expert and would appreciate objective input Thank you, Starr
    4 points
  37. Here are a few of the test helmet stamp marks made by the Crosby Manufacturing Company. The Company had their own Steel Lot stamp marks ie- KCco, NCco,and OCco, these were used to identify the different heats of steel made. Other later marks known to have been used by Crosby were WA, and ZAO, the company was involved in early Experimental and devised their own letter codes to identify the different heats of steel produced. Once M1917 production began to speed up, they asked if they could keep their own system of marking, but were told by the Ordnance Department t
    4 points
  38. Well at least this helmet is easy to trace, it would have been used in Edinburgh
    4 points
  39. Yes more than likely one of their own workers acting as a fire watcher.
    4 points
  40. Brewery - I suppose this was worn by a form of Werksfeuerwehr or Werksluftschutz?
    4 points
  41. Here we have a Zuckerman helmet stamped RO&CO 9/41 = Rubery Owen & Co Ltd of Leeds. Has the name McEwan Brewery On front of helmet, liner is stamped but can't read the name of maker. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  42. A 99-year-old veteran has been surprised with a repaired set of his Second World War medals allowing him to wear them for the first time. Ken Batt, of Loughton, Essex, had never worn the awards he received while serving with the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry during the conflict. But the gift from serving soldiers in his former regiment means he can wear his medals on his chest in time for Remembrance Sunday. Mr Batt was just a teenager when he signed up to the army, having earlier worked as an apprentice at the Great Western Railway company. More under following link: https
    4 points
  43. Officially the longest single Treasure Bunker post . I take my lid off to you Kenny that's unprecedented attention to detail
    4 points
  44. Welcome to the forum Sue, both helmets are from the WW2 period the first with the letters MB is a Zuckerman helmet which were used by civilian volunteers in various roles , is there a letter M or L stamped near the hole this was the size of the helmet, if you look at the helmets index you will see a post about Zuckerman helmets not sure what the MB stands for. Second helmet is a brodie helmet, if you look inside the liner were the X shape rubber is there should be stamp marks on the metal cross bands normally makers letters and date, no idea what the emblem is.
    4 points
  45. Both helmets are World War 2 period. First helmet with MB to the front is a civilian type helmet with laced in liner, similar to that used by Fire Watchers during the air raids, however the green paintwork might indicate something else, perhaps the MB stands for mobile bomb disposal units(?), just a guess as never seen one like that before. Both helmets are in a very good condition, probably because they were in a box so long, free from dust and rust. The second helmet is definitely a military type, presumably army with that type of finish. The symbol does look like an Owl 's head, no ide
    4 points
  46. They came up as a trio and caught my eye so I grabbed them. They're tiny, considerably smaller that a Mk2 Pineapple I'll post a comparison photo. Cheaper in the States I think. Looking at Nambu Type 14 pistols to continue with the Japanese theme ..... maybe
    4 points
  47. Nice examples! I have not moved into this area of collecting yet.
    4 points
  48. Hey there, just got this 340th FA Regiment M1917 today. Upon close inspection, there are a couple of things that I have never seen before on an M1917. The most puzzling being the maker stamp, which appears to read "OC CO." (O in OC as in zero). This marking does not seem to follow the marking system of any other manufacturers. There are no numbers, no letter prefix, and there is what is most likely the abbreviation for the word "Company" inside of the C. The only idea I have behind this is that I remember seeing a post on a forum saying that the company that would be known as ZA first used its
    4 points
  49. Sure! They appear to all be early test helmets from before the ZA123 pattern of stamping was standardized. Others like this include KCco and NCco. The unusual rivet it mine is likely because the liner of the helmet was replaced while it was in service.
    4 points

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