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  1. Thanks folks! I appreciate the responses. I'll let her know it's not a real one.
    5 points
  2. It’s rough and looks fake.
    5 points
  3. Booklet has arrived I thought I’d share some photos on here .
    5 points
  4. https://www.zwiadowcahistorii.pl/ogromny-depozyt-niemieckich-helmow-z-ii-ws-odkryto-w-kurlandii/?fbclid=IwAR21rTKZiA1aP_lRVynLk8T6a8rBDO7z-ZkumYU98WxydBtiCB9bsrVKISk Helmets, recent find in Kurland Ogromny depozyt niemieckich hełmów z II Wojny Światowej odkryto w Kurlandii (translation required) N.B.: There are over one million German soldiers from the WW2 period who are still missing and have not been accounted for
    5 points
  5. Recently I’ve come across a Golden Party Badge that sparked my interest (pictures below). I was wondering if anyone with expertise surrounding this particular item can inform me as to whether they believe this one looks genuine, any tips in spotting the fakes and any good recommendations for books to research these particular badges. Cheers
    4 points
  6. I tend to avoid Golden Party badges unless they come from a veteran source or are totally text book examples. I do have a few concerns firstly the pin plate is attached in a very sloppy manner and upside down. Secondly I would expect any badge numbered higher than 10,000 made by Deschler & Sohn to be marked "Ges. Gesch." Also the numbers compare the 0 to the one Fritz posted. Of course there are always exceptions, such as the pin could have been repaired and replaced upside down, but in end with these non text book examples, it just comes down to personal opinions. That's why I try avoid them unless they are text book examples or have good provenance.
    4 points
  7. There is a vast number of books on the subject. Still considered competent are the catalogues by Detlev Niemann, which although out of print, can still be obtained. There are detailed photos of each award with descriptions, etc. There are also older books by Adrian Foreman, etc.
    4 points
  8. Unfortunately the auction house is based in Canada! But I have previously checked out all the terms and conditions of sale etc and it’s all fine and can be returned if ever proven to be a fake, but as with all things, a bad apple must slip through the cracks every now and then so I didn’t want to be a fool and just buy it without talking to some people who know their stuff when talking about militaria. Just need some second opinions on it to be honest. Also Fritz, is there any books you would recommend for Third Reich Militaria, specifically Medals and Badges for a beginner like myself? Cheers
    4 points
  9. If you have the possibility, go and see the item and speak to the people at the auction house, whether they would take returns or not. It would also be good to get some more competent opinions as well, even better if an officially qualified person gave you a written and signed expertise, these are usually with photos of the item. Sometimes a lifelong guarantee of originality is given, but not usually by auction houses, who simply handle these, but hold a certain responsability for what they accept for their auctions.
    4 points
  10. Ah okay. It’s currently for sale on an online auction website for considerably less than that but not too far off of the price I have seen some other websites sell it for. Despite being new to collecting Third Reich militaria, I am aware that these are sought after and thus faked a fair bit so I was just concerned as to the legitimacy of it. I don’t want to be fleeced of upwards of a grand! I do agree though, it has been through the rough! That’s sort of what made me think is it a dodgy reproduction but at the same time it could easily be attributed to damage over the past 80 years. I have seen some examples of reproductions and comparisons with real things and to me, the untrained eye, it looks alright, but obviously being new that could simply be as I say, the fact that I have an untrained eye and don’t particularly know what to look for.
    4 points
  11. The market value is around 3000 - 3500 Euros presently. Whether this is an original or not, I cannot say, as I have never handled one of these. The number on the back indicates the award to a particular person, originals should have that particular number, and theoreticly you can check the official lists for the name of the person it was awarded to, that is, if these lists still exist in an archive, if they haven't been destroyed by the end of the war. The example you show seems to have gone through the mill a bit, to the rear looks like the maker's name, which is hard to make out, is Deschler, München 9 Altogether there was a total of around 8 million members of the NSDAP, and a membership stop was issued before it became too many. These are of course the ordinary members, the Golden Party Badge was a special recognition. Each member received two examples, a smaller version for wear on civil clothing, and a larger with a proper pin for wear with a uniform. There are also versions with a buttonhole fastening rather than a needle, these were for wear on civil clothing, mainly by men. Each award was accompanied by a decorative award document with the name of the recipient and the date. One source states that an exact number of badges awarded is not certain, but up till 1935 the NSDAP static shows a figure of 22.282 awards. Example of a set Comparison, the normal party badge Internet photos
    4 points
  12. People obviously liked it as it sold for over £118... I was surprised as I didn't even pay a 1/3 that for the 1943 helmet I bought the other week..
    4 points
  13. German awards/medals, are usually very well made, with crisp lines, edges, etc. I agree with Mr. Bridger, it looks very crude. As with all SS items, there are many fakes.
    4 points
  14. Here's another helmet Stamped AMC = Austin Motor Co and dated 2/1941 , has an interesting label under liner which reads ( The Chief Constable A.R.P. Stores Jacksons Row Manchester 2 Lancs. ) has no maker marks on liner. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  15. Here we have a WW2 British made helmet stamped F&L 1939 = by Fisher & Ludlow Ltd of Birmingham Liner by JCS&W Ltd 1939 = J. Compton & Sons & Webb Ltd of London. Has a letter R on front of helmet for Rescue Party. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  16. Just landed the smaller earlier version. Nice find and nice to have both versions in my collection.
    4 points
  17. Here's Another Civil Defence helmet stamped Bomb Disposal on front of helmet unable to read any marks. Photo's from other sources.
    4 points
  18. WW1 German 37mm shells were very similar in appearance to the other nations shells. However they are typically harder to find. Note the difference in the brass casings. Image source, internet. pre-war markings on base of brass casing. war time example of markings
    4 points
  19. US forces utilized French made shells and equipment when operating the Canon d'Infanterie de 37 modèle 1916 TRP, these guns saw field use and were used in the FT-17 light tanks, and in some instances, aircraft. The US stored the rounds for field use into wooden crates which had a cloth bandolier strap in which 16 rounds could be held. The photo below illustrates this. The crate below is an original, however the leather carrying strap is a replacement. The 16 inert rounds are mainly the common type with a few steel shot types. In practice a gun in field service had a limber that held 14 of these crates for a total of 224 rounds. You can see the crate and the cloth bandolier just under the loaders hand. Most likely a training scenario as the crew are all officers.
    4 points
  20. Here are some US made shell casings for the 37mm. They are almost the same in appearance to the French made types, however towards the top of the brass casing, there are 3 indentations that help hold the projectile in place. These indentations are not on the French casings as seen in the last picture. Additionally, the base of the shells are marked quite differently.
    4 points
  21. Here is an example of the 40mm flanking gun projectile, which had a thin brass casing that held 24 lead balls weighing 32 grams each. Typically the brass shot casing sits lower in the brass casing base, but it is fragile and don't want to risk any damage. These shells do not come up for sale very often.
    4 points
  22. Some more photos, the map has Tripoli marked and underlined.
    4 points
  23. We are helping a widow in the neighborhood determine what some of her husbands collections include, and one of them is this Iron Cross. I suspect it may be real, but in searching this site and others it seems that there are some good fakes out there. I've done as many of the recommended tests which include determining if it is ferrous (is does stick to a magnet), shaking it to see if the iron insert is real (it is very slightly loose in the setting), slipping a piece of paper between the iron insert and silver (I can, confirming it is two separate pieces). It does have some characters stamped on the ring, but I can find no stamps or markings of any kind on the cross itself. I polished a very small edge of the cross with silver polish and it brightened right up. I took these photos with hopefully enough detail to help determine if it might be real, or just one of those good reproductions. I appreciate any help or comments. Thanks!
    4 points
  24. Thanks @Fritz! I appreciate the additional info.
    4 points
  25. The Iron Cross was a decoration awarded for outstanding service in the field, to all ranks. It was awarded in two classes, the example in your photo is the Iron Cross 2nd Class, which belongs on a black/white ribbon. Undoubtedly silver and iron. The marks on the ring look like 800, which is the silver content, an imperial crown and a half moon, which was a hallmark for silver after 1871. There are two further unclear letters which look like an N and something else, unclear stamping, which has partly worn down. There is a further article about iron crosses under this section, which lists all the main makers of the period. Recommend reading this. Be careful not to drop the cross, as the iron core can easily break, as often seen.
    4 points
  26. Thanks Kenny! What about the cross confirms that it is original? Is it the stampings on the ring, or some other detail on the cross? Also, was the Iron Cross an award, or the designation of a specific rank in the military?
    4 points
  27. Excellent John, thanks for sharing, could you post a picture of the front cover too
    4 points
  28. 3 points
  29. My neighbor lost her husband a while back and she has been going though his stash of stuff. She found this and was wondering if it might be real or a replica. It is not attracted to a magnet, and I can't see any markings of any kind on it. Any help identifying whether it might be a real medal would be appreciated.
    3 points
  30. Like most countries leading up to and during WW2, WW1 era machine guns were used for training, and defense purposes, sometimes in combat roles as well. Here are several Heer men with a MG08/15. This gun was slightly modified by adding a forward bipod mount and spider AA sights, the sight was stored on the side of the receiver when not in use. Most photos of these guns from WW2 show the blank firing muzzle adapter for use in training roles. A lot of the these guns were used on the Atlantic Wall as well.
    3 points
  31. Here we have a NFS helmet for No3 = Rotherham this belonged to a Section Leader hence the two red stripes helmet is stamped HBH =Harrison Bros & Howson and dated 1939. Photo's from other sources.
    3 points
  32. These photos taken by the Japanese Captured US Army AirForce pilots, Tokio 1942. Doolittle Raid: US bombing of Japan on 18 April 1942: The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, was an air raid on 18 April 1942 by the United States on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other places on Honshu during World War II. It was the first air operation to strike the Japanese archipelago. It demonstrated that the Japanese mainland was vulnerable to American air attacks, served as retaliation for the attack on Pearl Harbor, and provided an important boost to American morale. The raid was planned by, led by, and named after Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle, later a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army Air Forces and the U.S. Air Force Reserve. Of the 80 crew members, 77 survived the mission. Eight airmen were captured by Imperial Japanese Army troops in Eastern China, of whom three were later executed. The B-25 that landed in the Soviet Union was confiscated and its crew interned for more than a year before being allowed to "escape" via Anglo-Soviet-occupied Iran with the help of the NKVD. Fourteen complete crews of five returned to the United States or to American forces, except for one crewman who was killed in action. (internet sources)
    3 points
  33. German Soldiers with what appears to be a signaling device. Signal lights/lamps were used to send messages between trenches, as communications were typically disrupted by bombardments.
    3 points
  34. Hello, I am wondering if anyone can tell me the significance of the “30” on the back of the badge? I am searching through my great uncles things and he has one of these badges. Thank you.
    3 points
  35. I have just been given a Mark 1 Brodie helmet in barn find condition but complete with liner and chinstrap. The makers mark is FKS 118, as you say probably Thomas Firth & Sons Ltd, Sheffield. Cleaning it up, just a good rub over with WD40, one notices how creased the metal of the shell is. I imagine pressings of later helmets used greater pressure on their dies. The steel strip applied to the rim obviously did not have a longitudinal curve rolled into it so wrapping round the rim has raised excess metal on its inner circumference. The creases in the shell and raised metal of the rim strip give the impression of a rushed job under wartime conditions. The rim strip is magnetic, the shell non-magnetic. So the shell is almost certainly Hadfield steel (Mangalloy). See Wikipedia for interesting detail of the properties and uses of this alloy, one of the more tricky to form. Doubtless heat treatment regimes pre and post pressing evolved, improving the quality of pressing. The strip was probably insufficient to cause significant compass deviation for practical purposes when a hand bearing compass was used by the wearer. Tested with a Silva compass the needle shows very slight deflection. All the bare metal is lightly rusted but the outer shell has much of the roughened paint remaining though now very dark in colour. Inside there are patches of silver paint. The liner is detached as the rivets attaching it to the chin strap have rusted so one can have a good look at both sides of the shell and the liner. The liner is very well made, very neat sewing machining. The leather chinstrap and strip round the liner retaining the rubber tubes I have treated with Neats Foot Oil, a preparation used in equestrian circles for their tack. It helps restore the suppleness of leather but will do nothing for cracks in degraded leather. If buying Neats Foot Oil, look for genuine stuff without added mineral oil. I have successfully used it on old Sam Browne belts, leaving them for months between coats for it to soak in, while wrapped in polythene. Hung up by the buckle, in time set bends in the leather will straighten out. Once the oil has fully soaked in, Kiwi Parade Gloss restores the appearance of the leather. As with much of military restoration time and patience are of the essence. The leatherette of the helmet liner has just had a wipe with a damp cloth. How wonderful it is to still be able to find such tangible pieces of history.
    3 points
  36. PS I have just re-stocked with Neats Foot Oil. The one I buy is Equimins Pure Neats Foot Oil. It is 100% pure, no added mineral or vegetable oils. I buy it from my local country store - Russells. I have no other connection with the business. An advantage of this product is that it is in a plastic bottle. I use relatively little of it and a tin rusts if stored for long periods. It is best kept in the house as it will partially solidify in low temperatures, melting when warmed up. It comes in a 500ml size which I find a convenient quantity. Something to beware of is that Neats Foot Oil makes otherwise inedible materials attractive to mice. A paint brush left on the bench in my workshop had the bristles chewed off and a leather strap chewed up. Treating leather with Neats Foot Oil is putting oil from cow bones back into the leather so it stands to reason they are compatible. Whilst some things are counter intuitive and leather has been chemically altered by tanning this treatment has stood the test of time.
    3 points
  37. Although considered obsolete by WW1, the rotating barreled 37 mm gun was pressed into service. 1st Image is of a captured 37mm rotating barrel gun from Verdun. 2nd image is of a 37mm being used in an anti-aircraft role. image source, internet
    3 points
  38. I have been asked questions regarding the 37mm in WW1, so I will drop some information here to help explain the types and their usage. The US forces in WW1 mainly used French and British weapons as their military was not prepared for war, however before the US entered the war, many US factories were making weapons, guns and munitions for the Allies. The 37mm Hotchkiss gun got its start during the 1870s when Benjamin B Hotchkiss, an American inventor was supervising the manufacture of munitions for the French during the Franco-Prussian war. There was a lack of effectiveness with the current Mitrailleuse gun and began designing a replacement. There was a major factor that impacted his design, and that was the Congress of St. Petersburg (1868), which prevented European nations from the use of exploding ammunition during war, in which the weight of the projectile was less than 400 grams. So, Hotchkiss designed a round that was 455 grams and 37mm in caliber. His invention, the rotating canon was introduced in 1871, too late for the war, however over the next few years he refined the design and it was approved for use in 1875, and it was adopted by several nations. Its main roles at the time were for field use and for arming smaller naval vessels such as torpedo boats. Hotchkiss developed larger calibers for naval use as armor thickness increased, and a 40mm gun was developed for fortress defense, called the Flanking gun, these were used in WW1 and some even into WW2. As technology advanced, with warship design and with weapons, the rotating barrel design was replaced with a single barreled-quick firing type instead. Below is what is called the common type shell, which was made of cast iron and had a brass band around the base of the projectile to aid in flight stabilization by gripping the lands of the barrel upon firing. This projectile was made to explode upon impact and typically made about 15-20 fragmentation shards. Up until the later 1800's the brass casings were spiraled to prevent jams in the gun breech, however this was corrected with advancements in metallurgy in which stronger stamped single piece brass casings could be made, these are the types used in WW1 onwards. 2 types of fuses were used with these projectiles, the Hotchkiss type and the Desmarest, and they both look very similar in design. The Hotchkiss type fuse was designed for land use and was typically more reliable. The common type shells are typically the most often encountered types seen today. Sometimes the brass casing may have trench art type engraving. Sometimes the brass casing may have later WW2 dates on them as well. Typically the brass casing used in WW1 should have marking such as the ones in the picture below.
    3 points
  39. Narew, Summer 1915 Source: Ostroleka i okolice, PL https://ostroleka-i-okolice-1915.blogspot.com/2021/07/der-durchbruch-am-narew-czesc-7-narew.html?fbclid=IwAR0MTNDKYMnetc17ui8Kv5T4yZZibATvcq83pF3MibojdV_IhRhHVVo-KGc
    3 points
  40. very true Fritz
    3 points
  41. Here is a guide to the Russian alphabet, which I find helpful
    3 points
  42. 4. Mariupolskiego Pułku Huzarów - officers of 4th Mariupolsk Regiment of Hussars, July 1916, with officer and Junker list Rank explanations: Rjadowoi - Soldat Jefreitor - Gefreiter Mladschi Unteroffizier - Unteroffizier Starschi Unteroffizier - Stabsunteroffizier Feldwebel - Porpraporschtschik - Unterfähnrich Saurjad-Praporschtschik - Fähnrich/Stellvertreter Kornett - Ensign/Fähnrich Podpurutschik - Unterleutnant Porutschik - Leutnant Nadporutschik - Oberleutnant Rotmistr - Rittmeister/Hauptmann* Stab.Rotmistr - * Kapitan - Hauptmann Maior - Major (abolished 1884) Podpolkovnik - Oberstleutnant Polkovnik - Oberst Gen. Maior - Generalmajor Protoierei - Priest Doktor - Arzt, Doctor * Cavalry designation for Hauptmann
    3 points
  43. I would be very wary of facebook, the Big Brother Page, full of spyware, censorship and dubious characters squabbling and reporting each other.
    3 points
  44. Hi there, welcome to the forum, the Iron cross is original.
    3 points
  45. This is my Phillips MkV* bicycle, with original rifle mounts and cut out rack to allow the rifle butt to fit. Got this for a real bargain. It'll be doing some shows with our other ww2 stuff, when we get back to them. I'd like to find period photos showing what equipment was on them as I have a lot of stuff I could hang off it. Regards
    3 points
  46. Feldflasche! Another bargain, this time for 0,00 - found on a street corner, had been abandoned with some other junk. Cover and leather carrying strap/hook missing. The cap has been fitted with a hand-made string lanyard, which has been on it for a very long time. The capacity is just under one litre, roughly between 750 and 850 ml, when filled to the mouth. Thought at first it could be a military canteen, but more likely HJ or similar. There are no maker's marks, and of all aluminium construction. The lanyard is attached to a small ring around the top of the cap, which could be original to the flask. Quite definitely before 1945, and probably before 1939, has quite a few dents, which would not be visible under a cover. As a comparison, a Feldflasche of the Bundesgrenzschutz, 1957, could easily be mistaken for the real thing.
    3 points

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