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  1. Today
  2. Tom.Delahoyde

    Mark 1* Brodies

    Thanks Leon
  3. leon21

    Mark 1* Brodies

    Hi Tom, in 1936 the MK1 helmet had improvements made it was fitted with a new and improved liner and a new elasticated or sprung webbing chinstrap, and frequently a non-magnetic rim. They also fitted a square non-magnetic MK1 chin-strap lug which was attached by a machine rivet rather than a split pin, sometimes they would use the new MK11 chin-strap lugs that had the corners cut off. Some stocks of Brodie and MK1 bodies were re-used, this variant served until 1939/40 when it was superseded by the slightly modified MK11 variant, around this time helmet shells and liners began to be date stamped. If your helmet is stamped 1939 and has these improvements then it is a MK1*, the MK11 came out in 1940. If you look on page 2 of my post ( British WW1/WW2 Brodie Helmet Maker Stamps ) there is a Guide how to date your helmets and variants.
  4. Fritz

    Life in Occupied Paris

    Another interesting clip from 1940
  5. Fritz

    Unique uniform type

    Other traditional cuff types Brandenburgischer Aufschlag, Brandenburg cuff, worn by most infantry regiments and also the Foot Artillery (top right) The 3 outer edges had a coloured piping depicting which army corps they belonged to, white, blue, yellow or no piping; bottom left for ranks of Unteroffizier to Vizefeldwebel, a Feldwebel had a second row of Tresse. Deutscher Aufschlag, also known as the Saxon cuff, left: Infantry, right: Jäger and Schützen, Jäger-Bataillon 12 and 13 wore white metal buttons, Schützen-Regt. 108 wore copper coloured buttons Schwedischer Aufschlag, or Swedish cuff, was worn by various other troops, Dragoons, Kürassier, Field Artillery, etc. From left to right: Jäger-Bataillon, Feldartillerie, Train-Bataillon (Unteroffizier) Ungarischer Aufschlag, Hungarian cuff, not really a cuff, but more an application of decorative braid and cord in the Hungarian style to the sleeve, this style of trim is refered to as "Schoitaschierung", a word of Hungarian origin. Polnischer Aufschlag or Polish cuff, was worn by all the Ulanen or Lancer Regiments, but also by the Leibgendarmerie and the Feldwachen of each army corps.
  6. Here's a period photo of a very unique uniform type. All the most important details, apart from the GD monogram on the shoulder straps can be seen in this photo. The parade and walking out dress for Infanterie-Regiment Großdeutschland (1935), the cuff title in the first gothic style script. This special cuff was worn only by this regiment, and was known as either the French Cuff or also Neufchâteler Aufschlag, originally worn by the Garde-Schützen-Bataillon (Berlin) of the old army, which was also unique during that period, also worn by the Garde-Maschinengewehr-Abteilung, and no further units. Very few examples have survived.
  7. Yesterday
  8. Tom.Delahoyde

    Mark 1* Brodies

    Hi all, it’s me again. I have a query regarding Mk.1* Brodies, I always thought 1*s where ‘refurbished’ / ‘refitted’ WW1 Mk.1 Brodies. Where these then re-stamped because I have a Mk.1* stamped 1939 or did they continue to produce Mk.1s but under the name Mk.1* for WW2? Many thanks, Tom
  9. Thanks Tom, much appreciated always nice to see liner marks.
  10. Last week
  11. Tom.Delahoyde

    British Mk. 1* Brodie Helmet Liner Securing Bolt

    Sorry for late reply Leon but here you go: Hard to get a good angle with enough light without having to remove the liner.
  12. leon21

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    Great photo's Jeremy, thanks for posting them, do you know which cotton mill David Hague had ?.
  13. After November 1918 Südtirol came under Italian occupation and was annexed separated from Austria. The German language was prohibited and tabu for many years, local government positions were held by Italians from Rome, and nationalists were persecuted or excluded from public offices and qualified professions. It was briefly reunited with the Reich between the years 1943 and 1945 after Italy surrendered and was occupied by German forces. Since 1945 Südtirol is again under Italian rule. For many years in the earlier postwar period there were acts of defiance and even terror by "activists" in protest against Italian rule and the Italian language - "WEG VON ROM!" was the slogan. German speakers are still the majority of the population of Südtirol.
  14. Jeremy Poynton

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    And in fact I'm not an Oldham boy - we were brought up in Bramhall and Woodford, tho' antecedents on both sides, with Irish and Cornish added in, have roots in Manchester back to Victorian times; the old man and my maternal Grandpa were both in the rag trade. Indeed, David Hague, mentioned above, had a cotton mill in Oldham (sold in the 60s).
  15. Jeremy Poynton

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    And this last one is I think taken on a training camp on Salisbury Plain. Not sure of the date ... early 60s, I'd guess. You'll need a magnifying glass! The old man is three to the right from the feller with the stick on **his** right. I think to **His** right is David Hague, who was his adjutant at the time, and still with us - I'm hoping to see him and his wife in a month or two.
  16. Jeremy Poynton

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    And this I suspect vial the local paper in Oldham, Whitsun Wakes parade
  17. Jeremy Poynton

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    And this is him in 1940, before going on active service.
  18. Jeremy Poynton

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    I'm not sure I have any good ones of his TA days, but I'll have a poke around! As kids, dad used to take us to the barracks at time at weekends; sometimes we went out in the Centurions on the range as "supplementary" crew! Wonderful for a young lad. I can also recall going to a Whitsun Wakes parade in Oldham which feature the regiment and tanks - we were stashed up with the Mayor and co. on the steps of the Town Hall. I know the old man was devoted to the TA and very proud of being C/O. In charge when the Regimental Colours were presented to HRH Queen Elizabeth - here's a picture I do have to hand (not in great shape) - he's on the left.
  19. leon21

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    Welcome to the forum Jeremy, nice to hear from a fellow Oldhamer have you any photo's of your old man in uniform you could post.
  20. Looks good, could you take a photo of the liner markings for me Tom, sorry to take so long replying been down in Plymouth and Wiltshire since last Thursday.
  21. rankfilm

    The Collectability of the Adrian Helmet

    Wow that's some serious wear and tear! Thanks
  22. Jeremy Poynton

    41/47 Royal Tank Regiment (Oldham)

    Hi, My old man - Desmond Poynton was C/O of the 40/41st for some years. Great to see these photos. I recall attending a Whitsun Wakes parade in Oldham when the regiment, with tanks, paraded thru' the town centre. We were on the Town Hall steps with other local dignitaries.
  23. kenny andrew

    S.A. badge

    Did you find the museum Buster? I hope you didn't bump into the "head man"😬
  24. kenny andrew

    The Collectability of the Adrian Helmet

    Hi Rank, looks like a badly worn Peruvian Model 1934 Adrian Helmet, the center of the badge should have a face, which seems to have worn off.
  25. Earlier
  26. rankfilm

    The Collectability of the Adrian Helmet

    Hi everyone, I've found another badge/symbol that has me stumped. Does anyone have an idea if this pleated circular plate is a badge or something that's been added (it's on an Adrian helmet) Thanks in advance
  27. Fritz

    Trench Warfare

    and Infantry, July 1916
  28. Fritz

    Trench Warfare

    A cavalry charge at the beginning of WW1 - unknown which battle is meant here.
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