Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Gildwiller1918

Mosin-Nagant Bayonet

Recommended Posts

Here is a Mosin-Nagant socket bayonet, this one is the model 1891/30, which means bayonet design of 1891, modified in 1930. This was the bayonet the Russians used throughout WW2. This bayonet was modified with a push button stud to help secure it to the rifle. These bayonets were also used in WW1, but locked onto the rifles differently than the 1891/30 models. The bayonet itself is blued and has a flat-sided screwdriver type point on the tip of the bayonet. 

Interesting fact, during WW1, the rifles and bayonets were being manufactured abroad as the Russian production could not meet demand. France and the United States (Remington Arms and New England Westinghouse) made rifles and bayonets to support their ally. The US made over 469,000 prior to the revolution in 1917 and in 1918 along with several other nations, sent contingents of troops to Russia in support of the Czarist government. Officially these troops were supposed to be guarding the ports and supply dumps as Murmansk and Archangel, but soon were drawn into skirmishes with red forces. Since the Mosin-Nagant was being supplied to the Russians in large numbers, along with munitions, US troops were issued this rifle while in Russia instead of the M1903 Springfield rifles. 

IMG_2869.JPG

IMG_2865.JPG

IMG_2866.JPG

IMG_2867.JPG

IMG_2868.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are still many Soviet made pieces to be found, these cost around 25 Euros a piece, many probably early post-war.
A WW1 example would certainly cost more and is harder to find. These were always without a scabbard, and the bayonet
almost always remained on the rifle.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a pic of mine with bayonet fitted & off the gun. Sorry it's not a great pic , but it's so long with the bayo attached  to get a closer pic, it's around 5"8 inch long with it fitted .

20200407_163741.jpg

20200407_163816.jpg

20200407_164412.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice Buster, Rifle is a beauty!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pictures are good - it's always difficult to photograph a rifle properly because of the length. When magnified it would be ok.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Gildwiller1918 said:

Very nice Buster, Rifle is a beauty!

Thanks Gildwiller it is nice, a friend hand picked it for me directly from a shipping container at ryton arms . Ryton was the biggest UK importer of weapons from Russia , it came with the ammo pouches & the sling, I got the bayonet at a later date .

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good deal, like all surplus, eventually it will dry up and be hard to find. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Gildwiller1918 said:

Good deal, like all surplus, eventually it will dry up and be hard to 

As far as I am aware, Russia no longer exports guns to the UK, so no more for the collectors market. 

  • Like 3
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, those rifles can come from other countries as well, former communist bloc countries, or other nations they might have been sold to. But you have a nice one, keep in in good shape, who knows, it may become a very sought after item in time. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Russian bayonet was worn almost always without a scabbard, and almost permanently on the rifle, only removed for cleaning. That was the same procedure as in the old Prussian army as long as socket bayonets were used.
I didn't know Russia had stopped selling to the collector's market. There are now enough wealthy Russians who are collectors, and want to keep their history, without selling items abroad. After the fall of the Iron Curtain - Russians were selling everything off to get currency. Russian decorations from the Tsar's times are now incredibly highly prized, Russian collectors will no longer part with these, and they are regarded as holy.
Tsar Nicolas II. was canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church some years back. Kaiser Karl I. of Austria-Hungary was also canonized by the Vatican several years back, a very good deed. Nobody cares about our Kaiser! (Germany).  He would deserve more, unfortunately, Germans are no longer religious, apart from maybe a few old people in Bavaria.
N.B.: The normal bayonet goes for around 25 Euros, as already mentioned. Recently seen WW1 examples were at around 170 Euros - these had different markings. During WW1 many examples were made on contract by the American firm of Westinghouse. Many original Russian examples bore the mark Tyla (Tula) or Slatousk/Zlatoust.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...