Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/04/21 in all areas

  1. No way of determining if original or not? Even with corrosion holes. I don't see any chance there.
    2 points
  2. I am researching the HKK 2 and the 4th Cavalry Division in the “Great Retreat” from Mons and have become interested in Nery. I have found virtually nothing on this that includes German sources. I have found the histories of the 17th and 18th Dragoons, the 16th Hussars, the 3rd Ulans and the Reitende Abteilung, 3rd Artillery Regiment. You obviously have a copy of the 15th Hussars History. Would it be asking too much for you to scan the pages related to Nery for me. I am especially interested in the route to and the withdrawal after the battle. The British accounts simply say the D
    2 points
  3. I have been seeing an increase in repro WW2 German ID disks. Mainly coming from Easter Europe/Russia. These are aged and look decent. Buyer beware. Below is an example listed as a reproduction.
    1 point
  4. Here they are. Information on persons in Postcard of Wilhelm Gustlof. Johann Joachim Wilhelm Gaedert was born May 23, 1881 in Dassow, Mecklenberg, Germany, and died December 19, 1940 in Schwerin, Germany. He served in the 17th Reserve Field Artillery in WWI and was gassed by Arras in August 1917. An Accountant by profession, he became an Ortleiter in the DAF. It is possible that the trip to Hamburg was related to the DAF as we have several other post cards sent by him from various training schools. My mother in law said her father decided they would be home before the postc
    1 point
  5. Thank you so very much. Now for a few nights translating work. I do not know what your museum looks for. However, we do have a postcard of the Wilhelm Gustlof dated July 31, 1938. My wife's grandfather had taken her mother to Hamburg for a sight seeing trip from Schwerin and the card recounts what all they had seen, including the Gustloff. Luckily my mother in law and I scanned all of the family postcards and she translated them as I cannot read the Handschrifte. If this would interest you or the museum, I would be happy to send you a scan. Randy
    1 point
  6. Jpeg from a camera would be fine. What I am most interested in is what route they took to Nery after crossing the oise at Thourotte and where they went after the battle. The 17th Brigade went through the forest of Compeigne, while the other two brigades "went around it to the west." Randy
    1 point
  7. It could be the same helmet, construction looks the same. Only difference I see is that the Norwegian one in the link says they have a smooth olive drab finish, whereas yours has a sand texture.
    1 point
  8. Does it need to be scanned? Modern camera's take pretty good pictures of documents these days.
    1 point
  9. The cap is not an officer's, but for NCOs and enlisted men, and with the coloured band it would be Artillery.
    1 point
  10. In my collection i got a 1989 Soviet Officers cap, American G.I helmet, two wax 16 gauge ELEY GRAND PRIX CARTRIDGE'S and one 12 gauge IMPERIAL shell, a pack of real American most wanted cards, a Polish training grenade, 50cal bullet, 30mm helicopter or jet bullet, a anti-aircraft bullet a training one i think, loads of bullets and chains of bullets including a 44magnum round a 9mm round a 5.45mm AK-74 round and a german 7.92mm round, a mortar bomb, and my 1936 Mosin Nagant rifle with sling and a matching bayonett 'same serial numbers' some how it wasnt lost over all them years, and all the bit
    1 point
  11. That is an L and a P, and the line means "deleted"
    1 point
  12. Hi Chaps, Wondered if anyone can help? Recently acquired a 1938 Mosin Nagant 1891/30 which unfortunately has a broken sear spring. The rifle itself is in good original condition and it would be nice if it could be cocked without the bolt assembly sliding right off. Not too familiar with Russian weaponry so not too sure whether this spring is readily available or will have to be made. Any help would be very much appreciated. Also, it came with a bayonet but I'm not convinced that it belongs to this particular gun as the serial numbers don't match. Many Thanks BG
    1 point
  13. At present I do not have any possibility of scanning. I will see if I can get hold of someone who might be able to do this. Otherwise I will have to type in the text myself. It is briefly mentioned in the regimental history of the regiment., which was published in 1931. A further book about the regiment was published in 1991 by H.W. Faerber. In the book by H.W.Faerber there is very little mention of the action at Néry on p.136.* See also my other posts under Historical Museum in Wandsbek and Mecklenburgisches Dragoner-Regiment 17.
    1 point
  14. https://jmurrayinc1944.com/products/m1-helmet-dutch-used-original Olabilir mi?
    1 point
  15. This Reservistenkrug was recently on offer, was sold rather quickly for a very cheap price, due to damage. The pewter lid is missing, the end piece still attached, there are also a couple of minor chips and the bottom of the Krug has a small hole punched through, said to be when the man died, that this was done so that no-one else could drink out of the vessel. Gefreiter Gerth served 1906-1909 in the 2. Eskadron of the regiment. Possibly he was a WW1 casualty. The names are all listed on the sides of the Krug, which is the advantage of these pieces as they retain a historical record.
    1 point
  16. 7 cell Sten Gun Bandolier as used by British Paratroopers & Commandos in WW2. A really clean example here, unissued new old stock (NOS) manufactured by ME Co Broad Arrow marked. With seven very clean mags and 9mm inerts.
    1 point
  17. This is my mosin nagant m38.it was manufactured in 1941 The model 1938 Carbine: A carbine based on the M1891/30 design that was produced from 1939 to 1945 at the Izhevsk arsenal and in 1940 and 1944 at Tula. They were intended for use by second-echelon and noncombatant troops. Very few M38 carbines were made in 1945 and are highly sought after by collectors. Essentially a M1891/30 with a shortened barrel and shortened stock (the M38 is 40 inches (1,000 mm) in overall length versus 48 inches overall length for the Model 91/30), this carbine did not accept a bayonet; was in fact designed so
    1 point
  18. This is my mosin nagant 81/30, it was made by Tula in 1938, and has all matching numbers,it's in near mint condition! Although the stock may have been arsenal refinished,as it has a small square stamped into the butt.the Mosin nagant is a five-shot, bolt-action, internal magazine-fed, military rifle, developed by the Imperial Russian Army from 18821891, and used by the armed forces of the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union and various other nations. It is one of the most mass-produced military bolt-action rifles in history with over 37 million units made since its conception in 1891.
    1 point
  19. This is my WW2 M1895 nagant revolver dated 1944 and made by Tula. It came with the holster, cleaning rod, and lanyard and was deactivated in 1997 The Nagant M1895 Revolver is a seven-shot, gas-seal revolver designed and produced by Belgian industrialist Léon Nagant for the Russian Empire. The Nagant M1895 was chambered for a proprietary cartridge, 7.62×38mmR, and featured an unusual "gas-seal" system, in which the cylinder moved forward when the gun was cocked, to close the gap between the cylinder and the barrel, providing a boost to the muzzle velocity of the fired projectile and allowing t
    1 point
  20. the bayonett, bolt, buttplate and barrel shank serial numbers look like they havent been touched but on the magazine floorplate it has its serial number and another number next to it that looks like this л п 2890 with a line threw it
    1 point
  21. Ukraine was a part of the USSR until Communism fell apart, so a Ukraine mark simply means it was checked/refurbed there... but nearly all arms were checked in the Ukraine. The rifle probably came in, was inspected for refurbishment and found to be sound and so matching numbers remained but was stamped refurbished to show it had been checked. Also check to be 100% sure the matching numbers are original and there is no sign of earlier numbers ground off. Numbers were forced matched during refurbishments. http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinSerial.htm http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/Mosin
    1 point
  22. I have about 3 Point of aim proof markings, a Provisional black powder proof on the Barrel shank, a Izhevsk mark under the sights and on the bayonett and bolt. then just lots of weired circles and stuff like the gravestone shape with a C in it and what looks like a 13 and with the letter H above it and a circle with number 60 in it. I'll have to look into them more and see what they mean
    1 point
  23. it was refurbished in the ukraine but that stamp is on the stock, but if its all different parts wouldnt they have different serial numbers?
    1 point
  24. Only original would parts have all 1 factory, if refurbished the Russian Armory would pull apart the entire gun and cobble together parts, this was a very typical Russian thing to do and you would expect stamped parts from all sorts of places.
    1 point
  25. Yeah that does seem strange. If the serial numbers match you would think they were made and stamped in the same factory. Just having another look at this one to see if it makes any more sense. It's also a Tula made weapon. Would be interesting to see some photos to compare. Will do the same this end. Cheers BG
    1 point
  26. just helping out another comrade lol i found out what most of my markings mean on that website, ive got the Ukrainian refurb mark too but ive got some weird markings that arnt even on that website ive got the big Tula star on the barrel shank and the serial number below it and all the parts of the rifle match even the bayonett, but the bolt and bayonett have the Izhevsk Arrow in the Triangle mark but wouldnt they be made in the Tula factory? i'll have to put up some pictures.
    1 point
  27. Just checked out your links. Very interesting! Found out some things I didn't know especially the markings. It has a refurbishment mark on the barrel and what I think is a Ukrainian refurb mark on the stock. Have no idea when this would have been done. A number of other markings can't identify at the moment but will probably come to light over time. Many thanks for that. Just the sort of info I wanted BG
    1 point
  28. hey bren gunner take a look at these links i got a mosin nagant and its an intresting rifle dont know about the sear spring tho http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinMarks.htm
    1 point
  29. Cheers Greg. that was very helpful. had a feeling this was a genuine piece. Just feels right!
    1 point
  30. Hi BG- likely the bayonet would never match on a Russian weapon. They were never that careful with weapon ID numbers and the equipment was made to be rather universal. A Mosin Nagant bayonet was designed to always mount on the rifle and came without a scabbard. Originally it may have had a matching bayonet but this would quickly have changed with armory works, field swaps and re-issues.
    1 point
  31. Thanks for that Kenny. First foray into Russian armaments. Bit of a learning curve!
    1 point
  32. People have often wondered about deacs. Have they killed someone etc. Shock horror! The fact that they have survived at all in good condition almost certainly means they have been in a reserve store. But you never know
    1 point
  33. Thats a great song aint heard in a while tho, got it stuck in ma head now tho
    1 point
  34. I love 80s music so much better than some of the crap u get today lol
    1 point
  35. I got a really good deal for the rifle its Tula made too, i just wonder where its been who its shot? or stabbed? its just really fascinating that ever since 1936 the bayonett hasnt left the gun, its also got the square marking that means its been refurbished in the Ukraine so its gone from WW2 in Russia then to the Ukraine and now on my wall and the bayonett's been with it all that time lol.
    1 point
  36. I love the matching bayonet and rifle. They were made to attach to the rifle and not really come off for much. The fact that it has not is brilliant and does add a premium to the weapon.
    1 point
  37. USSR wanted it as the new communist anthem. Copyright problems though.
    1 point
  38. Wind of Change by the Scorpions! Great song.
    1 point
  39. Used to collect Soviet stuff myself back in the late 80's. The first items I bought from kenny were Soviet. Top of my collection was a Bulgarian officers cap and camo uniform. Now I just listen to 80s rock!
    1 point

Announcements

  • Welcome to the Treasure Bunker Forum - Please feel free to join and share your knowledge, with our growing data base of collectors and historians, both new and advanced.


×
×
  • Create New...