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Here is a WW1 era Mle 14 ball grenade, with the bracelet attachment (reproduction). The idea was that by using this bracelet, the thrower could get more distance and the fuse would last longer as the strap would pull the fuse from the grenade, rather then the user pulling then throwing it, it saved a few seconds. The strap itself is made form leather and has a twisted rope tied to a metal hook, which was re-usable. However in the narrow environment of the trenches, it could be hard to use this strap and grenade. Around the start of 1916, saw the introduction of reliable and practical grenades, until that point the French troops made due with whatever they could. 

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Nice work. Did you make the 'pin' yourself? I thought the grenade itself was know as a Bracelet Grenade. You learn something everyday. Nice bit of kit.

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Yes, the Mle 1914 was an updated 1847 model, and both could be used with a arm sling/bracelet. Yes I made the pin and the wooden top of the grenade as well, mine was missing. 

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I have also seen a version of the ball grenade fitted with a rifle grenade rod as well. Don't have that one yet.

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I wasn't aware of the 1847. I have an an 1885 89mm (as far I know). I do know the 1914 is 85mm mm in diameter.

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The 1847 model and the model 1876 ball grenades were 81 mm in diameter, only difference in these grenades was the fuse used. The 1882 model, also the same looking was the first to use a fuse that had a pull ring. 

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My 1885 and 1914. Note the slight difference in diameters.

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Interesting, they look so out of place in WW1, so basic in appearance and function. 

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  • 1 month later...

Here is an image from the internet showing the French ball grenade with the bracelet attachment in operation. Note the flare on a pole to the right. 

82.jpg

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