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Hello I am interested to see if anyone has a nice collection of VB grenades, launchers or other related accessories. I have some items myself, which I will post pictures of soon. Thanks in advance!

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In the US, VB items are quite hard to come by, even though we adopted them from the French. 

Attached is a view of 2 of my launchers with the respective grenades. On top is the US model 1903 and the bottom is the bulkier German counterpart. 

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In this picture, is another WW1 German cup launcher, similar to the one on the peg board but it has a three sided sleeve that goes onto the barrel. I am in the process of restoring it. I am having the screw ring made my a metalsmith. 

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Another one my M1903 launchers with the carrying case. When I got the launcher is was rust covered and nasty looking. I had it turned on a lathe, sanded and re-coated, turned out pretty good. These canvas cases came out in 1919-1920, so they would not be correct for a wartime appearance. Interestingly enough these cases were put back into production at the start of WW2. The US Marines used the VB's quite often in the Pacific theater. Note the small gas port at the base of the cup before the tapered part, 2 of these were drilled in a attempt to reduce gas pressure and wear on the rifle. In the US model a few posts up, that one does not have the holes. The pressure incurred from the launchers could damage the rifles, it is speculated that the M1903 had a extra recoil lug added to counter this effect. 

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Here is my French VB launcher used on the Berthier and Lebel rifles. 

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Here is my latest find, a VB Launcher for the US M1917 Enfield rifle. This is the twist on type, with a metal spring band to hold the sight and muzzle firmly while in operation. Un-Dug examples are very hard to find. Near the muzzle of the launcher you can see a knurled band, this was so that soldiers could feel the difference at night or in dark conditions. This version and the version for the M1903 Springfield are virtually identical, the M1903 does not have the knurled band however. 

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Here is my WW1 British Rifle Grenade set. This is the No. 1 Mark III rifle (SMLE-Short Magazine Lee Enfield), chambered in .303, a very sturdy, well made weapon, with a nice smooth action of the bolt, it held 10 rounds internally, a huge advantage over other rifles which normally held around 5. British, Commonwealth and even US troops used this rifle in WW1 with great effect. 

This rifle is fitted with a rod grenade and launching cradle. The cradle is mounted with the bayonet to the rifle, so the cradle is sandwiched between the rifle and bayonet. The grenade (inert) which is a No. 23, Mk3 rod type, this grenade could also be used without the rod as well. The grenade body is marked "H & TV 1917", the base plug is also marked "No. 23 . 111" "H & TV LD" with and additional "18". The rod was screwed to the base plug then inserted down the barrel of the rifle. Once the grenade was in place, a soldier would insert blank cartridges to use to fire the grenade. When the soldier was ready to fire, he would pull the pin of the grenade, the spoon will not come off as it is held by the cradle. The soldier will load a blank round and fire the weapon, typically at a high angle. Once the grenade leaves the cradle, tension on the spoon is released, causing the fuse to start. 

Rod grenades were a good way to increase the range of hand grenades, however they caused a lot of wear and tear on the rifles. These rifles were usually located in a portion of trench away from other troops in case of an accidental explosion as the explosives and fuses were not 100% reliable and safe. Another consequence of using rod grenades is that troops sometimes forgot to switch the ammo out, so a soldier could mistakenly fire a live round instead of a blank into the grenade with disastrous results. As rod grenades fell out of favor, the cup types that attached to the end of the barrel took precedence, these however also put a lot of stress and wear on these weapons. 

The grenade has a reproduction spoon, rod and pin, all other parts are original. The grenade cradle is modern reproduction as well, as they are extremely rare and expensive, so a nice mock up suits me for display purposes. 

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It is hard to find these items here in the US, I see lots of it for sale in Europe, especially England, France, Italy and Russia.

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The stock of the Lee-Enfield has been overhauled and repaired at some stage, sections fitted in to butt end, the brass butt disc is also missing and has been replaced by a wooden disc. Difficult to find an orig. butt disc, they have been recently on offer as copies. Ordonance sales, grenades, etc.  are very restricted in Germany.

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It is hard to get European Rifles in the US that have not been modified or stamped in some way. I have also seen the newly made butt stock discs for sale. 

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