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A ramrod for a French M.1822 pistol, some staining and light pitting, stamped with a number "1"

A flint for a flintlock musket for present day use, ideal to complete an antique military weapon.

A clearing rod for Mauser rifles, this variation is 32 cm and stamped with a "4", possibly denoting the size length, possibly for an export model

A spring tensioner (breakdown or re-assembly tool) for flintlock pistols or muskets, this was produced around 20 years ago as a usable accessory by the renowned firm of Peter Dyson, who worked for the Tower Armouries. I have used it myself and it is excellent. Precision worked steel with a slightly blued finish.

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A Mündungsschoner für a Gewehr 98 - WW1

 

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An original mid to late 19th Century  tool for French weapons (screwdriver). Chestnut coloured nutwood or mahogany construction, base is of brass, remainder of steel. With ordonance numbering. Will fit Lebel, Gras, Chassepot, etc. Superb quality with traces of age.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

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Various older copy parts
A crudely made brass trigger guard found on a French cavalry An 9 pistol. A crudely forged steel hammer and screw for a flintlock musket, found on a French M.1777 musket, probably of DDR origin or older.
A lock spring and hammer screw for French flintlock weapons, made by Pedersoli Italy, simply functional

 

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Original musket parts above, mainly from a French M.1777 musket: A 1777 upper stock spring, a sling swivel unknown, and the remains of a damaged sling swivel from a French 1777 musket.
Below, a part of a sword hanger, Prussian, late 19th Century. Right, bracket and screws for sling suspension from a WW1 Gew 98

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  • 4 months later...

Not for sale. I salvaged it from a rather wrecked 1822 pistol purchased in Berlin.  The wooden stock had been a  complete remake, not quite satisfactory, so I decided to part with it. You can still get these parts here and there, at arms fairs, etc. There are also copy parts available, which are satisfactory, such as by the Italian firm of Pedersoli or by Paul Jacobi in Iserlohn/Germany, he specialises in muzzle loading weapons complete, these are also fireable, they are are of very good quality and complete with all authentic ordonance marks, dates and maker's name, as appropriate.  He does also have some original parts. I got some spare parts and repairs done by him many years ago.

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I did not see anything, on either website. Saw a similar ramrod, but smaller caliber, mine is .69 caliber. Not many, available, in the United States. Sent an email, to Paul Jacobi. Thanks

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Yes, perhaps he can get the parts you require. There are also other sources, such as Comptoir Francais de L'Arcquebuserie near Paris, now called Galerie de Mars Armurerie Paris -  They specialise in such weapons, original and copy parts, but  changed their address some time ago, you may find them somewhere in the internet. I think France generally would be a good place to try.   I also have the earlier model An XIII dating from 1806, which could do with some original parts.

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A replica M.1777 pistol by Hege-Huberti-Pedersoli - this is calibre 0,69 (ca. 17 mm), but lacks the engraving of manufacturer's details.
Clearing rod below (bright), and the original clearing rod for the M.1822, this example with a conical or bell shaped end, which is hollow. The end piece has a diametre of 16 mm, total length: 19,6 cm. The bottom end has a screw fitting, as the 1822 model did not have an internal spring to hold the rod, as did earlier models. Diametre of bottom end: ca. 4 mm.  Total length of conical part; ca. 30 mm.

These measurements are a good approximation, but are no guarantee for absolute accuracy!
Diese Information dient lediglich als Hinweis - Jede Haftung ist hiermit ausgeschlossen!

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Great! The conical or bell shaped end maintains the same thickness, and completely hollow? The 3omm is the the length, of the whole bell? How long, before the taper? Length of threaded portion? Thanks

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No, it gets broader from the stem upwards towards the end - conical, otherwise completely hollow. Unfortunately, I don't have the technical means to mark the photo as you have - the length of the portion you marked is ca. 28 mm, and hollow - thickness at end, ca. maximum  1  mm, at variance due to possible wear or removed corrosion.  Length of threaded portion ca. 11 mm.

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This is about the best picture I could get. The rod also fits the M.1777, but is not the right style for the period.
Another possibility is Peter Dyson in the UK (fomerly by appointment to the Tower Armouries) - he can produce the best parts
and many years ago he was able to make for me a battery spring for an M.1777 musket, you will find him somewhere in the internet.
There again, he may have some original parts as well.

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That sounds really ok. You might be more on the safe side ordering one from Jacobi, as they have accurate copies. The shipping costs  for such a small item from Germany would not be that high, postage rates are probably cheaper than in the UK, I find. I would ask them for a shipping quote.

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  • 2 months later...

Here is an item have been looking for for quite some time, they turn up occasionally, but many are either modern copies, or Yugoslav 98 production,
a so-called Frog or Frosch for the carrying strap - K.98:

 

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  • 1 year later...

Magzine for MP 38 & 40, dated 1942
with maker's code kur, being Stey-Daimler-Puch, Warschau or Graz
Waffenamt Wa815

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