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Brodie

High quality color photographs. British side

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Many thanks to all of you. Outstanding pictures 👏👏👏

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2 hours ago, CluelessTommy said:

Sailor wearing a steel helmet, carrying a Bren gun (No Date)

Taken by an official Royal Navy photographer

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What a shot! 👏

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A German Tiger tank on its side in a ditch, North of Rome, and an american lorry in the background driving past (18 June 1944)

A.R. Tanner (captain) 

wonky panzer.jpg

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21 minutes ago, CluelessTommy said:

A German Tiger tank on its side in a ditch, North of Rome, and an american lorry in the background driving past (18 June 1944)

A.R. Tanner (captain) 

wonky panzer.jpg

Great photo, indeed.

Thanks!

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The webbing worn here looks very like the WW1 pattern, or is this a special pattern for the Navy?
(I mean the naval picture with the Bren Gun)

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8 hours ago, Fritz said:

The webbing worn here looks very like the WW1 pattern, or is this a special pattern for the Navy?
(I mean the naval picture with the Bren Gun)

I cannot comment directly on the set being worn in the picture as I am no expert in webbing however I did find this bit of information on a site about First World War Navy kit:

'The 1908 rifle sets were produced in vast numbers during the Great War becoming the standard British Army infantry set but their only WW1 Naval use was by the land based khaki clad Royal Naval Division later in the conflict, the R.N.D. force sent to defend Antwerp in 1914 wore blues and Victorian/1901 webbing, post 1920 the 1908 set entered full Naval use with surplus Army stocks equipping the Royal Navy throughout the 1920s and 30s and well into WW2.'

'The 1908 pattern showed the way forward for webbing sets so at the conclusion of the great war a new pattern of canvas sets was contracted from Mills for both rifles and revolvers for the royal navy, due to severe financial constraints procurement was very slow leading to at least one re-issue of the 1901 revolver sets and due to the availability of surplus 1908 rifle sets the 1919 pattern production concentrated on revolver sets so the  intended 1919 rifle sets were never needed'

From this information and what you have said the set in the photo is probably a 1908 army pattern of webbing that was used by the navy after being surplussed by the army, the navy did try to create their own webbing but did not have enough money to do so.

 

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That's a fair amount of information, I only know the WW1 and WW2 standard webbing, I also know the Victorian whitened buff leather slightly, but that's it.

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Inside Montgomery's caravan, Holland, October 1944

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A crew from the 16th/5th Lancers, 6th Armoured Division, cleaning the gun barrel of their Crusader tank at El Aroussa in Tunisia, May 1943
Ted Dearberg /Imperial War Museum photo

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Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) plotters at work at Coastal Artillery Headquarters in Dover, December 1942
Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA
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A 5.5-inch gun crew from 75th (Shropshire Yeomanry) Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery, in action in Italy, September 1943
Photograph: IWM/PA
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Women producing bullets and cannon shells in an underground munitions factory on the Wirral, Merseyside, 1945
Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA
 
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Land Army members sawing larch poles for use as pit props at the Women’s Timber Corps training camp at Culford, Suffolk, 1943
Photograph: IWM/PA
 
 
 

 

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Girl guides and sea rangers selling savings stamps

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An Auxiliary Territorial Service spotter with binoculars at an anti-aircraft command post, December 1942

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A civil defence warden inspects bomb-damaged buildings in Holborn, London

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'ATS girls’ operate a mobile power plant on an anti-aircraft gun site at night

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A district messenger boy walking past a bombsite in London

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A battery of 3.7in anti-aircraft guns firing at night.   All photographs: Ted Dearberg/Imperial War Museum

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St Paul’s Cathedral, London, sits amid destroyed buildings

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Celebrations at Waddington to mark Lancaster R5868 (S-Sugar) reaching 100 missions while serving with 467 squadron in May 1944

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Wellington GR Mk XIII of 221 squadron flies over the Aegean in March 1945

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Kittyhawk IIIs of the 112 squadron preparing to take off at a desert airstrip in Tunisia in April 1943

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Hurricane Mk IIDs, known as ‘flying tin openers’ preparing for takeoff from Gabes, Tunisia, in April 1943
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Avro Lancasters of the 44 (Rhodesia) squadron in September 1942
 
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Allied commanders from left, General Omar Bradley, Admiral Bertram Ramsey, Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder, Supreme Allied Commander General Dwight D Eisenhower, General Sir Bernard Montgomery, Air Chief Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory, and Lieutenant-General Walter Bedell Smith. These men were responsible for the success of Operation 'Overlord'
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Left to right: Air Chief Marshal Sir Charles Portal (Royal Air Force), Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke (British Army), Winston Churchill and Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham (Royal Navy) , Gardens, 10, Downing Street, May 1945
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Probably a black and white photo later hand coloured, none the less, dramatic
 
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Berlin, 12. July 1945. Marschall Schukow received the Order of the Bath from Montgomery.
On the right are NKWD officials.
(Schukow hatte das Gemüt eines Schlachterhundes)
 
Some of these photos may have already been posted in previous articles.
 
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