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High quality color photographs. British side


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Hi everyone,

I'm looking for uncommon color photos taken during WWII by the British, not painted but real color photographs like those amazing Kodachrome sometimes I find. Here some examples.

thanks you all

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PARATROOP TRAINING IN BRITAIN, OCTOBER 1942

19 October 1942 Parachute Training in Britain. Half length portrait of a paratrooper carrying a Sten gun, having loaded it ready for immediate action.

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A 15cm gun crew from the 75th Shropshire Yeomanry Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery, in action in Italy, September 1943. Notice the soldiers heavily bandaged thumb on the right.  

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March 1944 – Private Alfred Campin of the 6th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry during battle training in Britain.

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Hi everyone, I'm looking for uncommon color photos taken during WWII by the British, not painted but real color photographs like those amazing Kodachrome sometimes I find. Here some examples.

What a shot! 👏

Just the image to be posted here 😃 Like this one. Now it is your turn folks 😉

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5 hours ago, kenny andrew said:

Welcome to the forum Brodie, great photo's, will keep an eye out for more for you. I see you managed to upload your profile picture :thumbsup: 

Thanks kenny! I would appreciate more of them. Yeah, finally I found out the way to do so 😃

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2 hours ago, kenny andrew said:

Excellent Brodie, when you say you a looking for color photos are you looking for the actual original paper photo or just the image to be posted here?    

Just the image to be posted here 😃

Like this one. Now it is your turn folks 😉

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Good colour photos. Are there original captions with these, where and when taken? Otherwise the problem is that photos get used over and over again by all and sundry, and the origin becomes lost.

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undated, unplaced.

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Thanks guys. Great photos.

I'm afraid dear Fritz I'm not able to date the photos I added to the colection. Nevertheless, analizing the photo itself one may reach to some conclusions regarding the place or period of the war they were taken. Regards

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Some research could do the photos justice.

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Yes, if you post a picture and don't have the caption, just write "no caption available" underneath , then if others can perhaps find the original caption, I can then edit the posts to complete them.   

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Another idea is we could post a description, such as the one below for example as in this case it's a famous personality but not everybody may be aware of who it is. So you would have a description, then the picture, then the original caption. Also try to avoid copyright material with watermarks etc. I found the original caption for your first picture Brodie which I will now edit. 

Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Arthur Montague "Boy" Browning, GCVO, KBE, CB, DSO (20 December 1896 – 14 March 1965) was a senior officer of the British Army who has been called the "father of the British airborne forces". He was the commander of I Airborne Corps and deputy commander of First Allied Airborne Army during Operation Market Garden in September 1944. During the planning for this operation, he memorably said: "I think we might be going a bridge too far."   The photo below was taken at Netheravon Airfield it is a grass strip airfield on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, England. Established in 1913 by the Royal Flying Corps, it became RAF Netheravon from 1918 until 1963, then AAC Netheravon(Army Air Corps) until 2012. Buildings from 1913 and 1914 still survive on part of the site.    

Major-General_Frederick_Browning,_commanding_the_British_1st_Airborne_Division,_Netheravon,_2_October_1942._TR174.jpg

Major-General Frederick Browning, commanding the British 1st Airborne Division, Netheravon, 2nd October 1942. 

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45 minutes ago, kenny andrew said:

Another idea is we could post a description, such as the one below for example as in this case it's a famous personality but not everybody may be aware of who it is. So you would have a description, then the picture, then the original caption. Also try to avoid copyright material with watermarks etc. I found the original caption for your first picture Brodie which I will now edit. 

Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Arthur Montague "Boy" Browning, GCVO, KBE, CB, DSO (20 December 1896 – 14 March 1965) was a senior officer of the British Army who has been called the "father of the British airborne forces". He was the commander of I Airborne Corps and deputy commander of First Allied Airborne Army during Operation Market Garden in September 1944. During the planning for this operation, he memorably said: "I think we might be going a bridge too far."   The photo below was taken at Netheravon Airfield it is a grass strip airfield on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, England. Established in 1913 by the Royal Flying Corps, it became RAF Netheravon from 1918 until 1963, then AAC Netheravon(Army Air Corps) until 2012. Buildings from 1913 and 1914 still survive on part of the site.    

Major-General_Frederick_Browning,_commanding_the_British_1st_Airborne_Division,_Netheravon,_2_October_1942._TR174.jpg

Major-General Frederick Browning, commanding the British 1st Airborne Division, Netheravon, 2nd October 1942. 

Great job Kenny! Surely I haven't got time enough to do that exhaustive job of reseach. Beautiful photos, rather interesting the one of Monty in his denison smock, how modest and natural, how different from those german generals. Thanks

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Thanks Brodie, I have also found the caption and edited your second photo. I'll also tidy up this thread when it becomes bigger. Fritz I have moved your German post to a new section for German Color photos I think it will make an interesting thread too :thumbsup:   

waf.jpg

Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) plotters at work at Coastal Artillery Headquarters in Dover, December 1942. 

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That's fine with moving to a separate chapter - I don't think I've ever seen any of the above colour photos before, very interesting. Agfa was one of the first companies to produce colour films, if not the first. The Allies did not use colour photography as much as the Germans, but a few key colour snaps were made, as we know.

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10 hours ago, kenny andrew said:

Thanks Brodie, I have also found the caption and edited your second photo. I'll also tidy up this thread when it becomes bigger. Fritz I have moved your German post to a new section for German Color photos I think it will make an interesting thread too :thumbsup:   

waf.jpg

Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) plotters at work at Coastal Artillery Headquarters in Dover, December 1942. 

Marvelous photo indeed 👏🏼. Thanks!

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Found the caption for your third picture Brodie and updated it. Here's another couple of nice photos this time of our Canadian allies, could not find a date unfortunately.  

Canadian Army Women during The World War II (10).jpg

CWAC platoon marching. Canadian Women's Army Corps

Canadian Soldiers in The World War II (13).jpg

Basic training in Lansdowne Park, Ottawa

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Another good photo of our Canadian allies, Major General Frederic Franklin Worthington, MC, MM, CD, nicknamed "Worthy" and "Fighting Frank", was a senior Canadian Army officer. He is considered the father of the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps. Worthington was born in Peterhead, Scotland. Here he is in a Fox Armoured Car at Parliament Hill.  

Fox-Armoured-Car.jpg

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Very unusual photos indeed, extremely good colour quality. Used then were either Ilford Colour or Kodak. Ilford was more renowned for decades for acurate black and white, they are probably Kodak film.

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These are some very interesting pictures,

An article by the smithsonian air and space magazine quotes British war photographers using ‘Kodachrome film obtained from the united states’ 

It also says that around 3,000 photos were taken using this film however only 1,500 remain and they were given to the imperial war museum in 1949. There is a published book that contains 80 of these pictures and the others can be seen on the IWM website.

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?query=colour+photographs+&pageSize=15&filters[collectionString][MINISTRY+OF+INFORMATION+SECOND+WORLD+WAR+COLOUR+TRANSPARENCY+COLLECTION]=on

Regards,

Jack

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A Churchill Tank of the 51st Royal Tank Regiment crashes through a hedge during the advance across the Italian countryside (20 July 1944)

Taken by A.R, Tanner (captain)

large_000000.jpg?_ga=2.235366081.1968479592.1543949112-878734960.1540329226

 

Sailor wearing a steel helmet, carrying a Bren gun (No Date)

Taken by an official Royal Navy photographer

large_000000.jpg?_ga=2.232678495.1968479592.1543949112-878734960.1540329226

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