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leon21

The Falklands War

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Came across this Falklands War Medal for sale at a local Auction  the other day, first one I've seen, this medal

was awarded to a crew member of H.M.S. Intrepid and had a guide price of £500 to £800.

Here's a couple of photo's for anyone who hasn't seen one

364[1].jpg

Falklands Medal.jpg

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Intrepid was the second of her class of purpose built LPDs used by Royal Navy. She was built in Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, at the John Brown & Company yard and was launched in 1964 before undergoing trials and commissioning in 1967. She was the last ship built by John Brown & Co for the Royal Navy. Intrepid became the first Royal Navy warship equipped with satellite communication equipment in 1969. As a result of defence cuts, Intrepid went into reserve in 1976, being brought back into active service in 1979 to allow Fearless to be refitted.

It was announced in 1981 that the two LPDs were to be deleted, with Intrepid undergoing decommissioning in 1982 at the outbreak of the Falklands War. After decommissioning, the Royal Navy was due to sell Intrepid to Argentina. However, Intrepid was brought back into commission, with her ship's company recalled by Commander Bryn Telfer the Executive Officer, and Malcolm MacLeod, the crew gladly returned to form part of the task group committed to Operation Corporate, the British effort to recapture the islands. Intrepid was commanded by Captain Peter Dingemans.

With elements of 3 Commando Brigade embarked, Intrepid took part in the amphibious landings at San Carlos Water. HMS Intrepid was under attack in San Carlos Water on 25 May 1982, with a few fatalities, mainly Royal Marines. Nordic Ferry was also under attack. She came under heavy air attack once again during the operation, and was the main participant in the landings at Bluff Cove on 6 June. Margaret Thatcher and Sandy Woodward commended the efforts of the ships involved in the San Carlos attacks. The Intrepid would be the last ship to arrive, the last piece in the jigsaw, and so all the timings depended on her. As well as being one of the warships used for imprisoning the Argentinian prisoners of war, the surrender ending the Falklands conflict was signed on Intrepid's deck.

 

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Probably less well known is:

 

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A clear case of where Argentina overestimated it's own grandeur, and underestimated it's oponent, sheer ignorance on the part of the Argentine military. They should have known not to challenge a traditional and unsurpassed old seapower with a long experience of land and maritime warfare. The initial capture of the islands was easy but they should have known in the end that it would not pay off.

The sinking of the "Eduardo Belgrano" by an English U-Boot.

image.png.6b42099907d14fb5cf866c1205d68a10.png

 

Smile please Gaucho 🙂

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