Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
leon21

WW1 Bronze Death Plaques

Recommended Posts

I'm sure we have all seen these plaques, but would you know who made them by looking at one here are a few useful tips

on identification marks.

 

The designer of the plaque was Edward Carter Preston who's initials can be seen in front of the lions front legs ie= E.CR.P.

They were initially made at the "Memorial Plaque Factory" 54/56 Church Road Acton London W3 from 1919. Early Acton

made plaques did not have a number stamped on them, but later ones have a number stamped behind the lions back leg

also all Acton made plaques have a wide letter "H" the true function of the stamped numbers is not know, it might be that

they identified the work of a given founder/bronze casting worker or was part of a quality control batch number, no plaques

to Naval casualties were made by the Acton factory.

In December 1920 manufacture was moved to the "Royal Arsenal Woolwich" London SE.18, plaques manufactured here

can be identified by the WA in a circle stamp mark on the back of the plaque and a number stamped between tail and back

leg. The mould was altered by Edward Carter Preston later, he made the wide "H" into a narrow "H" so he could add the letter

"S" for the Women casualties in all 1500 plaques were made and all have the number 11 stamped on them.

The mould was changed again removing the letter "S" but kept the narrow letter "H" most of the Naval casualties have plaques

with the narrow "H" and just a few were made with the wide letter "H" not sure why the Navel casualties were left till last.

Smaller or miniature unofficial bronze plaque were produced by other manufacturers, for example Wright and Sons of Edge-

ware Middlesex who sold them for 13 shilling and sixpence each with the name left blank.

 

Here are some examples.post-3823-0-80806400-1461681993_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-07530100-1461682015_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-96961100-1461682036_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-36930700-1461682066_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-47500200-1461682080_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-05130500-1461682096_thumb.jpg

 

The plaques read the words She/He Died For Freedom and Honour round the edge.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part two Documents.

 

The soldiers next of kin would have also been sent a letter of condolence and scroll with the soldiers name rank and

Regiment.

The plaque would be sent out in a white or brown envelope, inside would be the plaque in a brown cardboard box

and also there would be a issue/receipt card and prepaid return addressed envelope, each soldier was logged/listed

under an individual number stamped on the card which had to be signed and returned to the factory.

 

See examples.post-3823-0-97347300-1461693338_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-61715500-1461693353_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-31308700-1461693378_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-35336000-1461693402_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-62122200-1461693417_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember buying those plaques from the Barras 40 years ago! They where usually still in the Brown foldy out envelope, pity there not the same price now! You where getting them for pennys back then.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here we have a good example of a Memorial Scroll with original postal tube and a letter of Condolence from No1 Infantry Record Office York.

WW1-Memorial-scroll-with-postal-tube-original[2].jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lance Sergeant (lance corporal is still in use)  is stated in text, this I have never heard before, I'm sure this title was later abolished. Many of the old German ranks were abolished after WW1. Do you know any more about this?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul, the rank of lance sergeant was an appointment given to a corporal so that they could fill a post usually held by a sergeant.

The appointment could be removed by the soldiers Commanding Officer unlike a full sergeant who could only be demoted by court

martial, the rank of lance sergeant was abolished in most regiments and corps in 1946.

The appointment is retained now only in the Foot Guards and Honourable Artillery Company in these regiments today all corporals

are automatically appointed lance sergeant on their promotion and wear three white stripes were a full sergeant wears gold stripes.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×