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RAD Arm Insignia


Fritz

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RAD Arm Insignia

This is a standard arm patch, worn on the left upper arm of the Reichs Arbeits Dienst, or Labour Corps. The Area and unit number are depicted on an upright shovel head, which was the standard emblem of the RAD.
Shown also, is a picture of a young member of the RAD. This was sent to me by an old acquaintance, who has an elderly French lady as a neighbour. The French lady, in younger years, was married to the RAD man, who then later died in an accident, presumably during the war. The French lady has been living in Germany since. Unfortunately, nothing more is known about the RAD man.

RAD-Spaten.jpg

post-173-0-95181000-1457029225_thumb.jpgimage.thumb.png.edb7fd8607916372ac60b0598086702a.png

 

post-173-0-91091400-1457029589_thumb.jpg

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Nice photo Fritz,

 

I have a few RAD items myself, he's wearing the 3rd pattern collar patch introduced in 1942, and wearing the 2nd pattern

Rad-Arbeitsmann brown shoulder strap with black and silver twisted cording around the edge which indicates that he had

volunteered for at least one years labour service, this strap was introduced in 1940.

 

I'm wondering if he served in France and that's how they met.

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Unfortunately I don't know any more about him. I think they must have met in France during the war, and I am not sure whether he died during or after the war. The French woman probably remarried, as she has children and grandchildren and lives in Hamburg. She is now at an age where she beginns to dither.
The person I heard this from hasn't had much contact with me lately, but she told me so much and sent the photo, asking what sort of uniform it was. Unfortunately, the armshield numbers are not completely visible in the photo. It would be nice to find out more. The lady I got the information from speaks good English. The French lady is called Martha.

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I have often seen RAD uniforms with no shoulder straps and no collar patches, just the spade and armband, sometimes they have an open dark brown collar with lapels and shirt & tie, sometimes a closed dark brown collar. What is the significance?

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Hi Fritz,

 

Here are 5 photo's of mine,post-3823-0-26201700-1457261075_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-08599500-1457261094_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-28715000-1457261117_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-93182700-1457261141_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-59433600-1457261159_thumb.jpg.

 

Pic. 1&2 are of the uniform worn by RAD from 1933 - 1936 when small changes were made to the uniform and again in

1938 in 1940 a new issue uniform was worn.

pic.1 is of Max Forster the Id photo show's him wearing a plain colour collar patch which would be red he's wearing wings

of a musician which would be coloured red stripe silver braided on a black backing.

 

Pic.3 of a RAD member wearing the 1940 issue uniform his arm patch indicates he belongs to 4th Detachment 256 Arbeits-

Gruppen of XV Arbeitsgau ( Divisional District ) Hessen-Sud.

 

Pic. 4&5 again of 1940 issue uniform lower ranks no collar patch no shoulder strap.

 

The 33-36 uniform was called the walking out dress they would have worn the Robin Hood style cap with it.

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Looking at your photo again he is wearing the 1940 issue uniform, his arm patch looks like 37? if it is a number 7 which

I'm sure it is then he would have been in one of the Arbeitsgruppen of XXXVII Arbeitsgau ( District ) Sudetenland-West.

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Interesting information am attaching two further pictues of RAD. These digitals were sent to me quite a few years ago from somebody called Dennis Köhler. They are of his grandfather, and I am not sure if his name was Köhler, or perhaps Hein. The first is an RAD image with open tunic, no insignia, except for armband and patch. The second photo shows him wearing army parade uniform, possibly of a Pionier unit. Unfortunately lost contact with D.K., so no further info available.

post-173-0-41534000-1457342321_thumb.jpgimage.png.ca2cda6c590e337511624b924c889371.png

 

post-173-0-94231700-1457342341_thumb.jpgimage.png.9711c6602573a5886251f487b70167f9.png

 

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Interesting photo's,

 

1st photo dates between 1936 -1940, he is wearing the 1933 -1936 issue uniform before changes, sometime during 1936

the lower pockets of the uniform were changed to side pockets in a slanted position.

He is wearing the 1936 issue collar patch for the rank of TruppFuhrer = ( Feldwebel ).

 

The ranks of Obervormann = ( OberGefrieter ) TruppFuhrer = ( Feldwebel ) and OberTruppFuhrer = ( OberFeldwebel )

only wore collar patches and no shoulder straps before 1940.

 

It was not uncommon for Rad personnel to later enlist into the armed forces or even during their labour service.

 

Here are two RAD items I've been trying to translate with no luck, If you are able to translate them I would be grateful

for any help.post-3823-0-77599100-1457367578_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-58154800-1457367595_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-77984500-1457367613_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-49568600-1457367629_thumb.jpg

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Here is the first document

Entlassungsschein / Certificate of Dismissal

 

Der Gefreite (Corporal.)..... Name:.Artur Bode(?)

Born on 5.2.1924 in Hecklingen (?)

Served from 16.1.1942 till 11.January 1944 conduct good

He was dismissed on 11.1.1944 to (hometown) Hecklingen / (illegible, Stassfurt), (illegible)Straße 13

His military papers wrre sent to W.M.A. in Bernburg (probably Wehr-Musterungsamt)

With his dismissal, he received:

Pay till 25.1.1944

Accomodation money till 25.1.1944

Provisions money till 25.1.1944

For his own property:

one shirt, one underpants, one pair of socks or footwrappings (Fusslappen), one handkerchief

 

Dismissal gratuity of the sum of 50 RM

Magdeburg, d. 11.1.1944

 

N.B.: Fusslappen were usually worn instead of socks in boots, always been so, also the Russians wore Fusslappen. These were still worn by the NVA until 1990. Usually made of felt or strong cloth

image.png.73d1ce1ce6b65860d9142fa9d1e513a6.png

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The second document is a Meldebescheinigung – certificate of registration. You still have this today, when you have a change of address, this has to be registered as soon as possible, I think wihtin 14 days, in those days much less, pref. Immediately.

This person has then registered at the city of Bernburg (Anhalt) , branch at Stassfurt, secondary office in Hecklingen-Anh. at the town hall (Bürgermeister-Amt) on 12th January 1944, without loss of time.There is also a stamp of the Arbeitsamt or employment bureau. N.B.: Every person also had an “Arbeitsbuch”, which also had to be shown, signed and stamped.

 

The next document is a hymn book (offical) of the Evangelische Church (not catholic) “Feldgesangbuch” – published by E.S. Mittler & son, Berlin SW.- this is a well-known military publisher, still exists today. It has a stamp of Schröder (with Feldpost No.), who was Evangelical Parson of the Wehrmacht.

- Pfarrer Schröder has presented the book to Gefreiter Bode (Name) – with dedication: Seinem lieben Kameraden Bode zur Erinnerung an den Russland Krieg und zu treuem Gebrauch - as a souvenir of the Russia Campaign and for loyal use, From your Divisional Pfarrer Schröder, 17.8.1942

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Last document

Page on left, handwitten dedication:

Fürchte Euch nicht, glaube nur! – Do not fear, just believe!

Zur Erinnerung an die Zeit im Kriegseinsatz zu Konstaninowka

In memory of the time of action in Konstantinowka (place in Russia) from (name illegible) Kriegs-Pfarrer, 17.9.1942

The next page:

Inhalt – contents / Deutsches Soldatentum – German soldiery /

Die Berufspflichten des deutschen Soldaten – the professional duties of the German soldier

Der Fahneneid des deutschen Soldaten - oath of allegiance to the flag

Aus den Kriegsbriefen tapferer deutscher Soldaten – extracts from war correspondence of brave German soldiers

Zuversicht – confidence

Gotteskraft – God’s strength

Todesbereitschaft – preparedness for death

Ewigkeitsglaube – belief in eternity

Treu bis in den Tod – true until death

Opferglaube – preparedness for sacrifice

Ich weiss, dass mein Erlöser lebt – I know that my Redeemer lives

Gebete – Prayers

Vater Unser – Our Father

Morgengebet – Morning Prayer

Abendgebet – Evening Prayer

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Excellent Fritz that's a big help thanks.

 

His name is Artur Bode who was in Rad Abt 1st komp 29th Arbeitsgruppe II Arbeitsgau ( Danzig-Westpreussen ) he was

at the village of Grutschno, Kreis Schwetz now called Gruczno in Northern Poland.

 

Below is a RAD Sonderausweis for him to travel to Stassfurt in 1941 not sure on what grounds he's going for. I have his

Certificate of Dismissal from RAD one month later.

 

The information from the hymm book is interesting at some point looks like he enlisted in the Wehrmacht and served for

a time in Russia in the rural area of Konstantinowka north of Donetsk in the Ukraine.

 

And below we have a letter from the Junkers factory in 1943 offering him a job if I've translated it correctly, this is my

favourite item for him.post-3823-0-59752700-1457442982_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-72460700-1457443007_thumb.jpg

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The reason for „travel“ was the Gehilfenprüfung – an exam – everyone has to learn a trade in Germany, for which there is a one-and-a-half to two year training, theoretical and practical – a „Gehilfe“ is the first step, thereafter, "Geselle".  The “Meister” is the highest step. Not everyone does a “Meister”. Academics don’t have to do this, they of course study, but can also learn a trade, but many will do a “Magister” or “Doktor” instead, Perhaps you have in some papers further details of what he was learning – you could also do this of course with the RAD, they did help – and of course aircraft engineering was what was needed in those days. This is background information, which gives you an impression of how things functioned.

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Very interesting thanks. :thumbsup:

 

Below is a image of the many variations and styles of uniforms worn both before and during WW2 from the book

German Uniforms of the Third Reich 1933-1945 - Brian Leigh Davis and Pierre Turner.

 

From left to right- Rad Truppenfuhrer Musician,- Rad Unterfeldmeister Instructer, - Rad Arbeitsfuhrer Officer

Rad Obervorman Guard, and RadwJ Arbeitsmaid worker.post-3823-0-36640900-1457529932_thumb.jpg

 

 

And a photo of Rad members wearing Fatigue uniforms.post-3823-0-90991100-1457530220_thumb.jpg

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Yes, I have some of these pictures in a book "Deutsche Uniformen im Dritten Reich" by the same authors, appeared in Heine Publications, 1980/83.

The fatigue uniforms - consisting of Drillichjacke and Drillichhose (usually white) were worn by all the armed forces, and these were even worn since at least 1808. These were specially intended for working in. A soldier does not work in his proper uniform, which always has to look its best. The old name of the Arbeitsjacke was "Camisol" or Drillichrock. In earlier periods, the arms were removed in summer period and stitched back on for the winter. These garments had to be constantly kept clean and were washable. A Kragenbinde was also always worn to keep the collar clean. This was inspected every day. From head to foot, everything had to be perfect and in a good state of repair. This also applied to footwear, the soles were regularly inspected, and woe betide if a single nail or boot stud was missing. Boot soles were cleaned with a toothrush - between the studs, etc. Drillich suits were also made in fielgrey and also worn as a campaign uniform, for example in Italy.

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Below is Max Forster Arbeitsdienstpass,post-3823-0-24217000-1457641682_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-60623700-1457641699_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

Coloured patches,

 

Prior to the outbreak of WW2 dark blue ( cornflower blue ) was used to indicate RAD medical personnel,

dark green was used for administration personnel, red for musicians, and light blue for RAD Justice Department.

 

During the war Specialist Officers were employed in the RAD,They wore narrow shoulder straps of a special

design, together with collar patches of a design similar to those worn by the regular RAD personnel. The background

colouring for their collar patches was black for Leadership personnel, dark green for administration, and lemon yellow

for war correspondents.

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That's a good collection of documents. Haven't really got round to collecting many RAD things, but in time. This last man was a Spielmann or musician, he didn't serve long with the RAD, surprisingly, as a musician, people like that would have been needed. He also wore glasses - Brillenträger, not wearing in the picture. Very iteresting. Rare is the headdress, which almost never turns up, if any, the higher ranks. Commonly known as the Robin-Hood-Mütze or "Kaffeebohne" (coffee bean), I only have the emblem for his, as well as the Bevo version for the Feldmütze, which occasioanlly turn up, but also become pricy. Sometimes these have a coloured piping around the crown, eg., black.

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Below are two feldpost letters to Klaus Schemel, 1st one when he is in the Rad and 2nd one now as a grenadier both dated

1944, sent from I presume his father.

Can you make out the full address on both letters,post-3823-0-85415600-1457709963_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-01271300-1457709979_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-07551400-1457710000_thumb.jpg it would be a great help.

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First picture:

 

Feldpost (military post)

Arbeitsmann Klaus Schemel

Fliegerhorst Kommandantur RAD Abteilung 1/334

Salzburg-Maxglan

12 b

 

Fliegerhorst is an airfield, usually military, Kommandantur is the Adminstration/ Commander

Maxglan is still an airport today in the region of Salzburg

 

Stamp reads: Fasse Dich kurz am Fernsprecher (!) keep conversations short on Telefone – Fernsprecher is the good old German word for Telephone, which noboby uses any more. – stamp is interesting – Stuttgart – Stadt der Auslands…..(?) can’t quite make out the rest, as blurred?

 

Next picture:

 

Grenadier Klaus Schemel,

7.5. Ers. u. Ausb. Komp.5 ( Ersatz- und Ausbildungskompanie 5) Ausbildung = training

Mühlhausen (Elsass) – ( Elsass is the German name for Alsace, belonged to Reich after fall of France )

Dragoner Kaserne – (This was the old former barracks of Badisches Dragoner Regiment 22 )

 

Last picture is the rear of an envelope with sender address – probably the father,

Stuttgart-Rohr – Rohr is the Stadtteil or area in Stgt.

Schwefelbaumstrasse 2 – the house number is always written after the street, even today, in the old days the city was written before the street, this was changed about 20 years ago, and the street is written first, and the next line is the city with a new Postleitzahl in front – the old Postleitzahl of Stuttgart, which was introduced postwar was 7000, W-Berlin was 1000, Munich 8000, Hamburg = 2000, Hannover = 3000, Düsseldorf = 4000, Cologne = 5000, Frankfurt = 6000. These were replaced by new numbers in 1993, which now have five figures and have become more complicated.

It would be worth googling some of the words written on these documents, try gooble earth or google maps for some of the Stuttgart addresses. Am not too familiar with Stuttgart, was there briefly twice many years ago. You can find more in the internet under Deutsche Post, Postleitzahlen, etc.

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Very interesting, do you have the letters to go with these, or just the envelopes?

First envelope:

Feldpost – Gossenburg über Coburg (Sometimes Coburg was spelt with a “K”) Gossenburg is nearby Coburg

Addressed to Fahrer Hermann Ehrlich (Driver)

2. Fahr-Ersatz-Schwadron 13 – 2nd Company of Transport Ersatz or replacement Squadron No.13

in Klattau / Böhmen – never heard of Klattau (now Czech), Bohemia, province is now Czech, (all names changed after 1945)

 

Sender (probably mother) Pauline Ehrlich, Gossenburg über Koburg – she spells it with a “K” – nowadays is usually “C”

 

Next envelope: S.S. Feldpost – (Stamp) Nürnberg, Stadt der Reichsparteitage – city of the Reichsparteitage

Addressed to:

Wolfgang Rohrwasser

N.S.K.K: Kurier Kompanie – this would be responsible for despatches, courier

Krakau, now in Poland, formerly Generalgouvernment, Krakau had/has famous historic castle

Burg Kaserne, castle barracks

Along side of envelope, sender; (Absender) Rohrwasser, Schwabach bei Nürnberg, Karlsgasse 8

(Schwabach was well known in the Middle Ages for it’s bookprinting industry – Schwabacher Buchdruck)

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Hi Fritz,

 

Yes most of the feldpost letters I have came with letters inside.

 

Here's Hermann Ehrlich 4 page letter that came with the enverlope.post-3823-0-24776500-1457863746_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-99538500-1457863760_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-19196000-1457863784_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-84374700-1457863800_thumb.jpg

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And here's Wolfgang Rohrwasser's letters,

 

I used to have a few for this person but now only this one left, not sure if some of the letters were mixed up and put in

wrong envelopes. post-3823-0-73684400-1457864541_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-53508900-1457864570_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-72839200-1457864592_thumb.jpg

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Interesting documents, do you have the letters to these?

First pic.: Feldpost

Fahrer Hermann Ehrlich (Driver)

2. Fahr-Ersatz Schwadron 13 – 2nd Company, Transport-Replacement Squadron No.13

Klattau – now in Czechoslovakia, name changed after 8zh May 1945

Böhmen – Bohemia, now a territory in CZ (since 1945)

Post stamp – Gossenberg über Coburg – small area near Coburg, sometimes used to be spelt with “K”, today always with “C”

Rear of envelope:

Absender (Abs.) probably the mother of recipient, Pauline Ehrlich, Gossenberg über Koburg, this time with “K”

 

S.S. Feldpost

Truppführer

Wolfgang Rohrwasser

N.S.K.K. Kurier Kompanie – ( Courrier )

 

Rear:

Absender (Abs,) Rohrwasser, Schwabach bei Nürnberg, Karlsgasse 8

(Schwabach was the centre of the bookprinting guild in the middle ages)

 

Stamp: Nürnberg 2 – Stadt der Reichsparteitage 31.3.42-16

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Hi Fritz,

 

If the letters I posted do not correspond to the envelopes then no.

 

Below are two feldpost letters from a Luftwaffe soldier with two different addresses for him. I have 5 of these from him

to Hannelore Zizler. looks like love letters.post-3823-0-56356300-1457890760_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-05615400-1457890782_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-45434400-1457890799_thumb.jpgpost-3823-0-81271600-1457890815_thumb.jpg

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