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Here is a recent find, a wartime version pickelhaube with the steel and nickel metal. The plate on this one is from Baden. It has an original chinstrap and repro cockades (until I find some real ones). The interior is not as pretty as there is some damage to the liner. The liner is stamped: Julius Jansen - Strassburg 1915, on the brim is a ID: IR 100 possibly...

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Nice fieldgrey fittings.  The Reichskokarde is well done with the colours, but the Baden cockade! Try removing the yellow and finish the cockade in a matt gold, the red ring is otherwise ok. The regimental number could be 110, or 170. N.B.:  Original cockades were always accurately painted, the ring should be perfectly symetrical, important are also the right tone of colours. The front plate should be attached by two long triangular leather strips. Otherwise a very nice helmet, unusual to find fieldgrey helmets with a regimental stamp, this would be an early one.

The following regiments were Baden:
Badisches Leibgrenadier-Regt.109 - L.G.R.110, Karlsruhe
Badisches Grenadier-Regt. Kaiser Wilhelm I. Nr. 110, Mannheim/Heidelberg   (may be stamped as J.R.110)
3. Badisches Infanterie-Regt. Markgraf Ludwig Wilhelm Nr.111, Rastatt
4. Badisches Infanterie-Regt.Prinz Wilhelm Nr. 112, Mühlhausen
5. Badisches Infanterie-Regt 113, Freiburg
6. Badisches Infanterie-Regt. Kaiser Friedrich III. Nr. 114, Konstanz/Wachkommando: Burg Hohenzollern
7. Badisches Infanterie-Regt. Nr. 142, Mühlhausen/E.
8. Badisches Infanterie-Regt. Nr. 169, Lahr/Villingen
9. Badisches Infanterie-Regt. Nr. 170, Offenburg/Donaueschingen
As you can see, these are quite rare, and hard to find in Germany. Baden helmets can be more easily found in GB, France and USA, most of them seem to have been "exported" at one stage, i.e., at the end of WW1. Of course, at the outbreak of WW1 additional regiments and reserves were raised, increasing the total number, the figures above are as at June 1914.

You should get yourself a decent reference work with a list of all regiments.

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other ranks' cockade, earlier version or also private purchase type with smaller hole

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Officer cockade

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Yeah fritz, I am not overly pleased with the repro cockades myself, but I have had no luck finding a real period Baden set yet. I will put the re-painting on my to do list. 

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I painted a Baden cockade years ago, it was a cast copy anyway, first of all I did the matt gold, the red ring I painted using a fine brush and the turntable of a record player, that was about 40 years ago. Not everyone has a record player nowadays, but it's an idea, and it turned out very well.

I would recommend removing the yellow first, either with a paint stripper or acetone.

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A good idea, I don't have a record player anymore. But do have some other items that may do the trick. Not really big into collecting the WW1 Pickelhaube, just wanted a few decent examples.  

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They are very expensive nowadays.

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Yes, quite, and so many versions, it would take some time and cost a lot. Plus the leather, preservation also can be time consuming and difficult. While attractive in appearance, these helmets were not practical for the war they were in, like most wars they used the last wars technology at first. Even the US had versions of these helmets with spikes, typically made from wool. Below is an example, pattern 1881 dress helmet.

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The Pickelhaube was originally a very usable headdress when it was introduced in 1842. It protected against wind, weather and rain, as well as against sabre and bayonet heaves, and against concussion.  The later models became thinner, smaller and lighter.
Construction of above is very similar to the British and Netherlands models. The tropical helmet was also derived from this form.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here is an update to the Baden helmet listed earlier. I have repainted the Baden Cockade to a more realistic look. Not perfect, but displays much better now.

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Yes, that definitely improves the look, the wartime gold finish would look dull anyway, as alternatives to gilt were used, however, you can still see the yellow edges to the red ring, I would try to cover these somehow. You can find these colour pens at a stationary shop, they have gold and silver, that might be a cheap and practical solution, otherwise, a very nice helmet.

N.B.: Es gibt Badische und Unsymbadische - Heidenei!
                                             (quote: Fritz Albrecht Horn)

 

 -  phrases from the Region

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was of the impression that Baden cockades were stamped brass, not painted with brass-colored paint. Perhaps I am mistaken?
There was a  seller in France recently selling brass cockade blanks that only needed the red ring painted. I used one of those for a recent Baden helmet restoration as shown in the attached photo.

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Baden cockades may have been usually of gilt brass pre-war. Shortly after the outbreak of war, such metals became increasingly unavailable. For a greymetal fitted example as above, the cockade would have been of iron with a gold coloured coating.

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1. Garde-Regiment-zu-Fuss
based in Potsdam. This was the most exclusive foot regiment in the Prussian army, and it had a long tradition, and was the personal guard of the Kaiser (King of Prussia). All the princes of the royal household wore the uniform of a Leutnant of this regiment as from the age of 10 years! For parades and special occasions this special mitre cap was introduced in 1894, replacing the old 1824 model, which had been a present from Czar Alexander of Russia. There were two basic forms of this headdress, the one form for the I. and II. Batallion, and another form for the III. or Füsilier-Batallion.. The first model depicted had the rear lined with red cloth and white braid, the pompom centre was red. The scroll to the front above a flying Old Prussian Eagle bore the motto: SEMPER TALIS. The headdress had white metal flat chinscales added in 1896, to prevent the headdress from falling from the head of the wearer.

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I. u. II. Bataillon

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III. (Füsilier-) Bataillon

The III. Batallion wore the same basic headdress with a yellow cloth backing with white braid, a yellow centre of the pompom, the scroll at the front bore the motto: PRO DEO ET PATRIA. On this example, the chinscales are missing. Supposedly only one set of chinscales was issued for both helmet and mitre cap. These caps were a remake of the traditional cap of the 1st Batallion Garde during the reign of Frederick the Great, 1740-1786

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An Unteroffizier of the Leib-Kompagnie, 1. Garde Regiment zu Fuss,  Immo Freiherr von Gayl, born 1888, photo dated 1906,
taken presumably in the gardens of Sans Souci, Potsdam. An aristocrat serving in the ranks, which was not uncommon in the Guards Regiments

 

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Prussian Tschako, various services

A wartime Prussian line Tschako with silver fittings. The Tschako is fitted with greymetal sideposts and chinstrap fittings, which are original to the helmet. The sideposts have been officially lacquered with the type of varnish which covered the helmets, which was applied during a later period of service with the Prussian Police in the Weimar Period (Republik Preußen). The plate would also have been changed for this purpose. There is a later date stamp of the Schutzpolizei Berlin and an eagle/swastika inside the crown. The plate has later been replaced with an original white metal Prussian Tschako eagle, This type of headdress was worn by following units during WW1;
Telegrafen-Bataillons 2-6
Luftschiffer-Bataillons 3-5 (Zeppelin)
Flieger-Bataillons 5 & 6
This type of headdress can be seen in old photos of aviation troops, notably the pictures taken outside Cambrai Cathedral of the funeral of Oswald Boelcke in September 1916.
This example was purchased from Adrian Foreman in London, Summer 1971. Adrian Foreman was the proprietor of Foreman, Picadilly (Formerly Tradition, Belmont-Maitland) and author of many books on Third Reich and other militaria topics.

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Cambrai Cathedral, September 1916, Ehrenwache for Oswald Bölcke +

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Ulanen Tschapka1915

This is an example of an early fieldgrey Ulanen Tschapka with grey metal tittings. This example has the standard fixed leather mortarboard. As per September 1915 regulations the mortarboard was to be removable, and these examples were made of thin pressed steel with a blackened finish. This example may be dated as 1914/15, and would have been worn by frontline cavalry units. It has hardly been worn and shows traces of long storage. Original Reichs cockade and chinstrap fittings, the leather is a replacement. The leather liner is light uncoloured leather with original drawstring, all showing some dryness. There is a date stamp of 1915 inside of crown. The extra small size line eagle and all fittings have their original dull grey finish. The oval cockade was missing and has been replaced.

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Ulanen Tschapka  in Ersatz material

A rare example of an Ulanen Tschapka made in fieldgrey felt, often referred to as Ersatz.
One unusual feature is the fact that this was still worn with chinscales, although of wartime manufacture, which would date this as of earliest wartime manufacture 1914-15.
Another unusual feature is that Tschapkas of this kind were fitted with the standard normal size line eagle, as opposed to the prewar models, which always bore a slightly smaller pattern eagle. This was probably a result of standardisation, using stocks of readily available parts. The mortarboard on this example is not removable, so can be dated as prior to the September 1915 regulations taking effect. Inside the helmet skull is the orginal black, thin leather lining
There is a very faint stamp of the unit, barely legible U.R.1.(?) and a small round paper label bearing a size 55 and the inscription: Verkaufskontor der Hutfabriken für Heeresbedarf, Lückenwalde. All fittings are in a slighly toned brass, the chinscales are fitted on the standard M.94 fittings, and are slightly convex. The original Reichs cockade is still present on the right side. The oval cockade is original, but most likely came from a shako, the wire fitting being rebent into shape. The toggle on the mortarboard is still present. This headdress would not have been worn by a frontlne unit. A similar example is shown in the standard publication, Die Deutsche Armee im Ersten Weltkrieg by Jürgen Krauss.

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Ulanen Officer   Tschapka

Tschapka for officers of Ulanen-Regiments 1, 2 and 3. This officers Tschapka bears the special pattern of eagle with the oval breast shield with FWR monogram. These three regiments were the most senior of the Prussian line regiments of Ulanen.

The Tschapka body and mortarboard is constructed in four segments, which can be frequently seen on officers examples. The liner is the standard light brown leather sweatband with a ribbed silk, which shows signs of wear and looseness. The peak is lined in fine green leather. All fittings are of gilded yellow metal, with pronouncedly convex chinscales and rosettes. The Reichs cockade is of officer quality. The oval cockade is of silver bullion with a black velvet centre and backing and shows age tarnishing. The silver cap lines hook on the mortarboard is missing. These were removed by wartime order. The heraldic eagle has lost much of its original gilding, but still bright. The corpus and mortarboard have some warping and traces of crushing at some time, but have been lightly restored and cleaned.

    This pattern was worn by following regiments:

Ulanen-Regiment Kaiser Alexander III von Russland (Westpreussisches) No.1

Ulanen-Regiment von Katzler (Schlesisches) No.2

Ulanen-Regiment Kaiser Alexander II von Russland (Brandenburgisches) No.3

    Ulanen-Regiment 1 was the regiment in which Manfred von Richthofen served, and he constantly wore this uniform till his death in April 1918

Ulanen-Regt. 1 and 2 were founded on 1st August 1745, Ulanen-Regt.3 on 16th May 1809.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Tschapka, Ulanen-Regiment 6

This is an example of a Tschapka as worn by Thüringisches Ulanen-Regiment No.6, based in Hanau. See also article under History topics.

This is a standard M.89/95 Tschapka with white metal fittings and the smaller pattern line eagle.. The chinscales and side posts were always in yellow metal (exept for Garde regiments)

The leather corpus and mortarboard are of the standard pattern, the toggle to mortarboard is still present and held the caplines or cordons, when worn. The oval cockade is a replacement, the Reichs cockade original. The mortarboard is fitted with an orginal red parade rabatt trimmed with white braid and with leather edges. For full dress, caplines and a white, falling horsehair plume were fitted.

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Tschapka with Rabatt, Parade Plume and Cap Lines (Cordons / Fangschnur)

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Full Parade Dress Uniform, Ulanen-Regiment 6

The full title of the regiment was Thüringisches Ulanen-Regiment No.6 and its home station was in Hanau. The regiment was raised in 1813 during the Napoleonic Wars. The regiment wore on its epaulettes the monogram of King Christian IX of Denmark in his honour. In the first days of the war, the regiment saw service near Neufchâteau, near the Meuse, then to the Aisne. After reaching the Marne at beginning of September 1914, it had to withdraw to Rheims and the Somme. Thereafter the regiment was divided into two half regiments and sent to the war of movement in the East on the Vistula (Weichsel), in Masuren, and then in Galicia. After rejoining the two halfs of the regiment, it was sent to Serbia 1915/16 and to Roumania in 1916/17. From July till December 1917 it saw service in guarding the coast in Schleswig-Holstein, where a British naval landing was feared. After that it was sent to the Italian Front, where it executed police duties in the rear areas. In March 1918 it was despatched to the West, where it mainly saw rear-area duties and despatches. At the end of 1918 the regiment returned to Hanau, where it was disbanded on 1st March 1919.

 

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Königs-Ulanen-Regiment No.13

This is a Tschapka for other ranks of the Königs-Ulanen-Regiment (1.Hannoversches) No.13, based in the city of Hannover, and belonging to the X. Armee Korps. Formed in September 1866,. After 13th September 1899 Kaiser Wilhelm II. appointed himself as regimental commander in chief, and wore the uniform of the regiment when appropriate.

The regiment took part in the war of 1870, including the battles of Vionville, Mars la Tour and Gravelotte, and the encirclement of Paris. The regiment remained in occupation, till returning in June 1870 to Hannover. During WWI, the regiment formed the 19th Cavallerie Brigade, together with Oldenburg Dragoner-Regt.19 and was at the Marne, later on the Aisne, thereafter, dismounted as infantry in the first trenches. In November it was transferred to the Eastern Front, where it remained till the end of the war. Unfortunely, there are hardly any records for this regiment. The tradition of the regiment was carried on by the 1st Squadron of Kavallerie-Regt.13 in Hannover during the Reichswehr period. Ulanen-Regt.13 upkept the traditions of the former Hanoverian Gardes du Corps and of the 1st Heavy Dragoon Regt. from the Kings German Legion of George III of England.

The item depicted is the model 1889 Tschapka with the special pattern emblem awarded by order of Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1899 in honour of the 100th anniversary of the campaigns of the Hanoverian troops in the Peninsular Wars. The guard eagle in white metal and star bears the battle scrolls Waterloo Peninsula Garcia-Hernandez. The Tschapka is well worn and is fittied with an older set of chinscales, which are too wide, too heavy and too short, and were taken probably from a Tschapka of the older model. The toggle (Fangschnurknebel) on the mortarboard is missing, these were removed by order in 1915/16. anyway, as were the helmet spikes. Cap lines or Cordons (Fangschnur) were worn until the first months of WW1. The Feldzeichen or large front cockade is an old collectors replacement. The stiching to the front peak is slightly loose.

The uniform of the regiment was a dark blue Ulanka (tunic) with white facings and epaulettes with the crowned monogram of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The Ulans were traditionally armed with a lance, as was the entire German cavallry after 1888.

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War memorial (Kriegerdenkmal) in Hannover-Eilenriede to Hannoversches Ulanen-Regt.13, apparently still exists, picture from 2010. This memorial is also dedicated to those of Kavallerie-Regt.13, who fell in the 1939-45 War. The 1.Eskadron or Schwadron (squadron) maintained the tradition of former Ulanen-Regt.13. A cavalry regiment normally had 5 squadrons.

(picture: wikipedia)

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One of the few remaining military buildings in Hannover. This is the remains of part of the stables for the horses of Ulanen-Regiment 13. The remaining buildings of the barracks were taken over for use by the Leibniz Universität after the war. This historic ensemble is soon to be renovated and restored.
(23.2.2017)

http://www.rottenplaces.de/main/restaurierung-des-ehemaligen-pferdestalls-der-koenigs-ulanen-27104/

 

 

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Garde-Ulanen Tschapka, fieldgrey

A fine example of a field grey Garde-Ulanen Tschapka by Manuacturer Maury & Co. in Mainz, dated 1915
The condition is almost mint. The Tschapka has a removable mortarboard of blackened, pressed iron. Steel fittings with fieldgrey finish. The chinstrap has suffered from what is known as american dry rot and has lost a lot of its original deep brown finish, leaving the reddish brown leather exposed. Liner is pale brown with original drawstring in mint condition. Reichs cockade and National Feldzeichen both original. The emblem is the guard eagle with star, smaller than on infantry helmets, which was always the case with Ulan headdress.
From an auction in Southern Germany in 1987, this helmet is depicted in the standard work Militaria by Jan Kube, published by Podzun-Pallas Verlag in 1987, p.100
There were three regiments of this kind:
1.Garde-Ulanen-Regiment, Potsdam, raised February 1819
2.Garde-Ulanen-Regiment, Berlin, raised February 1819
3.Garde-Ulanen-Regiment, Potsdam, raised 7th May 1860

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Prussian Landsturm Tschako

The Prussian Landsturm infantry units were mainly raised in wartime, but did exist on paper during the peacetime years. They were composed of older men, who had previously served with the regular army and later in the Reserve and Landwehr. Landsturm recruitment effected men up to the age of 64 years. Landsturm units were equipped with obsolete arms and equipment and were basicly used as a home defence or for behind the lines service, such as guarding occupied districts or prisoners of war. The basic uniform for the Landsturm was the Tschako (or Czako) with a large black and white cockade covered with a silver Landwehr cross. Thye wore usually a plain blue Litewka, a single breasted tunic with a fly button front, shoulder straps were of blue textile material. Insignia, if any, was worn on the turndown collar, usually the number of their corps in Roman numerals of gilded metal, below which were the arabic numerals of their unit. Weapons were usually the Gew. 71/84 or even older, or captured weapons. Various kinds of bayonets were adapted to fit.

The Shako illustrated is a variation, not being the standard Prussian shako, but an older, non-Prussian type being adapted for service. The item shown is probably an older Saxon, Brunswick, Hannoverian or Hessian shako. This is the characteristic type made of strong felt, with a leather lid, a flat horizontal peak, leather binding to lower edge. The chinstrap is of strong lacquered leather, typical of the period, attached by two gilded rosettes, which have been blackened. The side loop to the left is of narrow black hat elastic, as seen on these types of shako and for fastening the black plume, missing on this example. The front has the standard large Prussian cockade in pressed metal with a Landwehr (Landsturm) cross mounted. It is unknown whether this item was worn with a black plume or with an oval cockade, or whether side cockades were fitted. There is no manufacturers mark on this early headdress, but inside are the remains of several paper labels of the various wearers. So far, nobody has been able to give any information on this unknown variation of Landsturm shako, which is definitely original and as worn.

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Garde Train-Bataillon, Tschako

The Train was the horse-drawn military transport of the various army corps. Each corps had one batallion of Train for various transport duties including the artillery munitions columns Artillerie-Munitionskolonnen. The Train troops wore the Jäger type shako with line eagle until about 1904. The Garde Train wore the shako with the white metal Guard Star helmet plate, above which was mounted the Nationale or oval cockade, and otherwise yellow metal fittings. Leather chinstraps were generally worn. After 1904 the pickelhaube with the line eagle was introduced, same as the infantry pattern, with the exception of the chinscales, which were rounded or convex. A black horsehair plume was worn for special occasions, white for the Guards. The uniform was a dark blue tunic with gold gilt buttons, similar to the dragoons, but with light blue facings and swedish cuffs. The Garde Train wore yellow Gardelitzen on collars and swedish cuffs. A whitened leather swordbelt and bandelier with a black pouch or box were worn. They were armed with an Artilleriesäbel and a cavalry carbine.
The example shown has an ink-stamped G.T.B. and 1889 inside the top of the helmet. The helmet plate is the white metal Guard Star with Suum Cuique motto and a Mit Gott für König und Vaterland bandeau around the star. On the right is the Reichskokarde, black-white-red, the left side has the imprint of a mssing cockade. The oval Nationale is a collectors replacement. The entire helmet is in very good, lightly worn condition with some ageing to the chinstrap. This type of helmet was also worn by the Garde-Jäger-Bataillon (Potsdam) and the Garde-Schützen-Bataillon (Berlin).

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Uniforms of the Train, Line (not Garde)

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The helmet was re-introduced in 1904

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Prussian Jäger Tschako

This is a well worn old pattern M.1860 Tschako of the Prussian Jäger Battalions. This pattern with line eagle was worn by all Batallions, except for 1st, 5th and 6th, which wore an eagle with FWR medallion. Jäger Batallion 7 also worn this pattern with a white, blue and red cockade Feldzeichen. Jäger Batalions 9, 10 and 11 were raised after 1867. Batallions 12, 13 and 15 wore the Saxon shako. Jäger Btl. 14 was Mecklenburg, and worn an emblem and cockade of their own pattern.
The old model shako has a leather chinstrap with a rectangular brass buckle at the front, and is attached with iron slit screws (eiserne Schlitzschrauben). Shakos of this pattern were also worn until 1904 by the Train Batallions, until they were equipped with the pickelhaube. Older Shakos were also adapted for wear by Landsturm troops at the beginning of World War I.

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Tschako of Prussian Jäger Bataillon No.10

Shown is a wartime example of a Prussian Jäger Tschako (also known as shako or czako) with peacetime quality fitings in gilded yellow metal (Tombak or aluminium bronze). The inside has an indistinct maker mark and a date of 1915. There is also a stamp in the rear peak of KBAG, indicating that it had previously been issued to the Guards, which durng the 1915 Carpathen campaign had served side-by-side with troops of the Xth or Hannoverian Korps (J.B.10 etc.). The Feldzeichen is an old collectors copy, the cockades and chinstrap are original and have never been removed the cockades have impressed themselves deeply into the varnish of the helmet and stuck firm.
The heraldic eagle with FR displays the scrolls with battle honours due to this particular unit, which historically, was of Hanoverian origin; WATERLOO PENINSULA VENTA-DEL-POZO, latter names refering to the Spanish Peninsular campaign, in which Hanoverian troops, serving with the Kings German Legion, took part. This scroll was awarded by order of Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1899 to mark the hundredth anniversary of the start of this campaign. Various other Hanoverian provincial units in the Prussian army also received similar honours. The 10th Jäger Batallion also was awarded at the same time, a light blue cuffband with yellow embroidered GIBRALTAR honour, which was also awarded to Füsilier-Regt.73 for same reason.
Hannoversches Jäger Bataillon No.10 was stationed in Goslar in the Harz Mountain District and had previously stood in Colmar on the border to France.

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Tschako of Schützen- (Füsilier-) Regiment No.108
Dresden (XII.Saxon Armee-Korps)

Shown is a Saxon Tschako of Schützen- (Füs.-) Regt.108. This was the only regiment in the Saxon and German armies that wore a shako during this period. The regiment was raised when the Saxon Jäger-Bataillon No.15 was disolved and the soldiers incorporated into this new regiment, along with companies taken from other Saxon regiments during the 1890s.
Saxony originally had three Jäger Batallions, 12, 13 and 15. The Tschako was the same as previously for the other two Jäger units, but had instead of white metal fittings gold coloured.
The Saxon Tschako was of a different pattern to the Prussian examples, and had a lower front and no rear peak. The front peak was almost horizontal. Instead of the usual cockade - Feldzeichen, a black horsehair plume was worn, which was fastened to the left of the shako with a black hat-elastic loop. Cockades of Saxon pattern, but much smaller were worn under the chinstrap. Officers also wore chinstraps in place of chinscales, but of a different pattern. The emblem was the Saxon star in yellow metal, with a white metal crowned coat of arms, with the addition of an intertwined hunting horn. The Plume was worn so that it half concealed the emblem, falling to the left side, secured at the bottom end with a sling of elastic cord. This particular example is dated 1915 and has a wartime brown leather chinstrap. The cockades here have been replaced, as the orginals were missing (certain dealers in Germany tend to remove parts as spares before putting on the market, but demand the full price). There is also a Kammerstempel of R.108 and B.A.XII (Bekleidungsamt 12, Dresden) This particular example is otherwise mint and possibly never worn. Leftover stocks after WW1 were used by the Saxon police right up to the Third Reich, but with a different Emblem, certainly without a crown. This headdress was worn with a rush green cover in the field with red and later green regimental number to the front. The plume was worn until early 1916, when spikes etc. had to be removed in the field as per Sept. 1915 regulation. Tschakos with greymetal fittings were also produced.

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A set of cockades for the 108 Regiment Tschako. Unused manufacturer stocks mounted on old card.

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