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  1. Below are some images of a WW1 German maschinengewehrhandwagen or machine gun hand cart. There were at least 2 models, one for the MG 08 and another for the Mg 08/15. The above images how the MG 08/15 hand cart. Note the wood holders around the water jacket and receiver to secure it for transport. WW2 version of the same cart, however the main body was made from stamped steel instead of wood. WW2 version for the MG 08
    3 points
  2. Telephone sets "F" MkII I got my field telephones working, soldering two U2 size Duracells in series to power each. I took the screw terminals from two old Ever Ready 126 bell batteries and soldered them onto the Duracells for convenience of connection/disconnection. Small blocks of wood cut to size lift the Duracells up to the connecting wire terminals. Otherwise U2s fit very well. These phones came with four silica gel desiccant packs in each box. Five minutes in the microwave and ten minutes in hot sunshine reactivated/rejuvenated them. Coming out of the microwave they were steaming. After airing in the sun one knew from the sound the desiccant made when moved that they were very dry. There was an initial minor fault in one phone. Having a pair made checking the handsets easy, swapping them over one could hear clicks when the receiver switch was depressed and could hear blowing into the microphone.. The fault was in one of the bodies not the handsets. A plug-in induction coil had worked loose. The quality of the innards is amazing. Working again after 70 plus years is testimony to British engineering of the period. With one phone in my grandsons' playhouse and one in my workshop we all had fun. Militaria can amuse all ages. Spike
    2 points
  3. liner certainly does not look wartime
    2 points
  4. Well, it does have a leather strap...
    2 points
  5. I mentioned to the seller that I thought the box had nothing to do with the hat, they didn't know. Noticed they're also selling the rest of that reenactment uniform which they state as postwar but with ww2 buttoms fitted to make it look right... From what I can tell the fold down rear flap on those hats was removed in 54, so it's either earlier than that or a repro.. I can't tell, so that leaves me having to give it a miss.. But.. if the seller comes back saying the strap IS leather, i'll be unsure anyway.. I did find a collector selling a complete WAAF officer's uniform all dated to 1943 and in very good condition but he wanted £900 .....! wow..
    2 points
  6. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/255060250125?ul_noapp=true This is on ebay.. It looks too good, but seller says it's definately not a repro, but he also doesn't know how old it is as it has no marking in the hat.. The badge is very close to one I found on internet but the crown is slightly different, whether that's just because they varied depending on who did them... Thoughts? I've asked the seller if the strap is leather or plastic..
    2 points
  7. These stamps discovered in a second hand shop, three lots, all reasonably cheap. Amazing that so many of these were left over and never used: Deutsche Reichspost, June and December 1922 Reichspräsident von Hindenburg, 1. October 1932 edition, here is a complete block totaling 25,00 M, some of which have become detached and some with slight damage, as found. Reichspräsident von Hindenburg, 1. September 1932, a partly complete Bogen, some with slight damage, as found Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren after October 1938 and one overstamped Elsaß, after June 1940, a small collection as found These are mainly Dienstmarken, mixed, as found BRD - Deutsche Bundespost, 11. Oktober 1979, "Tag der Briefmarke", one Bogen complete totaling 6,00 DM, never used!
    2 points
  8. I had one of those LW daggers many years ago, really wished I had kept it...
    2 points
  9. I tend to avoid Golden Party badges unless they come from a veteran source or are totally text book examples. I do have a few concerns firstly the pin plate is attached in a very sloppy manner and upside down. Secondly I would expect any badge numbered higher than 10,000 made by Deschler & Sohn to be marked "Ges. Gesch." Also the numbers compare the 0 to the one Fritz posted. Of course there are always exceptions, such as the pin could have been repaired and replaced upside down, but in end with these non text book examples, it just comes down to personal opinions. That's why I try avoid them unless they are text book examples or have good provenance.
    2 points
  10. Yes, and it is a shame that objects like these are wilfully destroyed through ignorance and prejudice.
    2 points
  11. The dicing on those glengarrys are red, white, and a very, very dark green, not black or blue. “Glengarry The Glengarry was introduced to the British Army by Lieutenant Colonel The Hon Lauderdale Maule as Commanding Officer of the 79th. It was a practical and popular form of bonnet which soon became the undress wear in the Highland Regiments and by the 1870s was worn by all the Lowland and many English and Welsh line regiments. The Regiment wears the green, white and red dicing previously worn by the Royal Scots, Kings Own Scottish Borderers, Royal Scots Fusiliers, Royal Highland Fusiliers, Seaforth Highlanders and Gordon Highlanders. It is worn at an angle slightly down on the right.” -2nd edition, 2018 Royal Regiment of Scotland uniform regulations. p.63 https://www.theroyalregimentofscotland.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/20180618-Master_v3_SCOTS_New_DressRegs.pdf
    1 point
  12. could you post a picture Spike
    1 point
  13. He's re-listed it for the same amount.
    1 point
  14. Does seem to be leather, but it can't be that old, and the badge, although excellent quality, does have that rather strange crown, I still tend to think it is post-war. The King's Crown was worn till 1953. I see the auction has now ended.
    1 point
  15. The 2nd class was worn on a ribbon, so it should have a ring and have reverse details, the 1st class is a pinback decoration and the reverse is plain silver with a large pin. See previous posts on this topic.
    1 point
  16. That's extremely useful, thank you! I'm sure it'll help other people beyond me as well to identify theirs' manufacturer. The one I have is unmistakably 2nd-class, so I've probably misread either the "H" or "R" mark as an "A".
    1 point
  17. I've found an Iron Cross (WWI edition) in some of my great-grandfather's things. Every legitimacy test seems to check out, except for the maker's imprint on the ring: Instead of "KO", it's an "A". Is this simply a case of a different manufacturer?
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Recently I’ve come across a Golden Party Badge that sparked my interest (pictures below). I was wondering if anyone with expertise surrounding this particular item can inform me as to whether they believe this one looks genuine, any tips in spotting the fakes and any good recommendations for books to research these particular badges. Cheers
    1 point
  20. There is a vast number of books on the subject. Still considered competent are the catalogues by Detlev Niemann, which although out of print, can still be obtained. There are detailed photos of each award with descriptions, etc. There are also older books by Adrian Foreman, etc.
    1 point
  21. Unfortunately the auction house is based in Canada! But I have previously checked out all the terms and conditions of sale etc and it’s all fine and can be returned if ever proven to be a fake, but as with all things, a bad apple must slip through the cracks every now and then so I didn’t want to be a fool and just buy it without talking to some people who know their stuff when talking about militaria. Just need some second opinions on it to be honest. Also Fritz, is there any books you would recommend for Third Reich Militaria, specifically Medals and Badges for a beginner like myself? Cheers
    1 point
  22. If you have the possibility, go and see the item and speak to the people at the auction house, whether they would take returns or not. It would also be good to get some more competent opinions as well, even better if an officially qualified person gave you a written and signed expertise, these are usually with photos of the item. Sometimes a lifelong guarantee of originality is given, but not usually by auction houses, who simply handle these, but hold a certain responsability for what they accept for their auctions.
    1 point
  23. From the same estate, two helmet covers: Field cover as introduced in 1892, numbers were added on 22. March 1897 Inside with red manoevre band, brass hooks for attachment. Later field cover as worn in 1914 Red band within, no hooks for attachment, with D.R.P. (patent) stamp
    1 point
  24. From the same estate, details Epaulettes for Leutnant. Shoulder pieces (pairs)for Leutnant and Hauptmann, the rank stars have been removed. All wrapped in cellophane for the past 42 years to avoid tarnish to the silver. Shoulder pieces for Oberstleutnant, two colour backing after September 1915. A further set of rank stars has possibly been removed (above the numbers), meaning that this was originally Oberst and regimental commander. Still wrapped in cellophane for the past 42 years to avoid further tarnish.
    1 point
  25. I have just come across this site. I was a kid at Waterloo Junior School from 1950 to 1956 and it was a great thrill to see the tanks come down from Oldham and turn round at the war memorial in Waterloo during their training. Regards Derrick Latchford
    1 point
  26. Thanks folks! I appreciate the responses. I'll let her know it's not a real one.
    1 point
  27. This is my Phillips MkV* bicycle, with original rifle mounts and cut out rack to allow the rifle butt to fit. Got this for a real bargain. It'll be doing some shows with our other ww2 stuff, when we get back to them. I'd like to find period photos showing what equipment was on them as I have a lot of stuff I could hang off it. Regards
    1 point
  28. Yes very odd, they all look fine now, maybe on this occasion it was my computer, perhaps a cache issue. Will need to find some of the other posts which had the same links and icons and see if they have also resolved.
    1 point
  29. Wow, its hard to imagine the amount of items still in the ground from the previous conflicts.
    1 point
  30. Recent finds in Poland. According to EU Laws these will probably be destroyed by the authorities
    1 point
  31. https://www.gotech.at/lale2/langenlebarn_2.html Die Geschichte des Fliegerhorstes Langenlebarn von 1936 bis 2000 Kurzversion aus der Dissertation von Herrn Dr.Mag. Hubert Prigl. Hallo Herr Hermans, ich empfehle Ihnen obige Seite aufzusuchen, es handelt sich um den Flugplatz Langenlebarn (Tulln) der deutschen Luftwaffe von 1938 bis 1945. Falls Sie dort keine entsprechende Information zu der gesuchten Einheit finden, empfehle ich weiter Kontakt zum Autoren Dr. mag. Hubert Prigl in Wien aufzunehmen. Er hat fundierte Kenntnisse rund um die Geschichte des Flugplatzes und kann Ihnen sicherlich weiterhelfen. Es is durchaus bekannt, daß mehrere Zwangsarbeiter auf dem Flugplatz beschäftigt waren, in der Nähe waren auch Kriegsgefangenenlager mit französischen und russischen Gefangenen. Einiges an Information können auf der oben angezeigten Internetseite eingesehen werden, spezielle Fragen können Sie an Herrn Dr. Hubert Prigl in Wien richten, er wird sicherlich dabei behilflich sein. Weitere Informationen finden Sie beim Bundesarchiv Deutsche Dienststelle (ehemals WASt - Wehrmachtsauskunftstelle) Eichborndamm 179 13403 Berlin https://www.bundesarchiv.de/zwangsarbeit/ Zwangsarbeit im NS Staat "Im Winter 1941/42 wurden in den Baracken nördlich des Fliegerhorstes die ersten sowjetischen Kriegsgefangenen untergebracht. Davor waren französische Kriegsgefangene im Barackenlager untergebracht gewesen. Einige der französischen Kriegsgefangenen arbeiteten auch in verschiedenen Dienststellen, wie zum Beispiel im Baubüro des Fliegerhorstes mit. Die Behandlung der französischen, belgischen und später italienischen Kriegsgefangenen durch deutsche Soldaten und Zivilarbeiter war als korrekt bis freundschaftlich zu bezeichnen."
    1 point
  32. hallo Ich suche info uber das arbeidskommando Hv/49 in FLIEGENHORST TULLN meine grossfater war dar in WOII als kriegsgefangene Er war in STALAG 17A ( 10-07-1940 bis 13-02-1941 ) Er war auch in ein arbeidskommando A371/L in Hainburg an der Donau Fielen dank Koen Hermans Wateringe 17 2880 Bornem belgie
    1 point
  33. x Roadworks around the Museum, cables, drainage? A very old cast iron Sieldeckel was uncovered by roadworks some years ago and was no longer required. Since acquired by the Museum and now in the grounds behind the Museum. Age uncertain, but certainly before 1937, as everything thereafter was marked 'Hamburg' rather than Wandsbek. "Canalisation" is written with a C, rather than a K, so probably even older.
    1 point
  34. Period image showing this above listed mess kit worn on the pack.
    1 point
  35. At least all complete. A Luftschutz gas mask. The mask is very similar to the Wehrmacht mask. The tin etc. are for Luftschutz use. Auer was one of the leading makers of masks etc.
    1 point
  36. Came across this today. Condition is excellent.
    1 point
  37. Very interesting and extensive collection of items., some of these you would hardly find at all nowadays. The Schokakola is still around nowadays, I remember seeing it in the early 70s, you can still buy it, but hard to find. Today it is manufactured by Scho-Ka-Kola GmbH in 22848 Norderstedt (Hamburg), no longer by Hildebrandt in Berlin. It was said to have contained "Pervitin", the wonder drug, which provided energy and vitality. I don't know whether the recipe is the same today. Here is a box from about 2014, expiring 04.08.2016. Dienstglas - the binoculars are an early example, being of brass, wartime examples were made of zinc, which becomes apparent when the black finish wears off, as in most cases and also had the wartime manufacturers letter code. Most of these smaller sets have a grid scale within the glass. Cartridge cases are also very collectable, I have had several good sets in my time, but unfortunately ended up trading these for other items. I still have an unmatched pair in almost perfect condition, which I will show at a later stage. The gas mask filter looks as though it could have been Luftwaffe issue, being bluegrey, it is unusual to find a Maskenspanner (keeping the mask in shape) nowadays. You need a good set of straps for the canister, these are increasingly hard to find.
    1 point
  38. Just arrived from the other end of Germany - Friedrichshafen, and at an amazingly reasonable price I thought. Unfranked, issue of 1. August 1941, there is even one more than I bargained for in the lot , with 2 slight colour variations of 6 Pf. example. These are catalogued as DR 781-798 The same issues but franked examples
    1 point
  39. My main study is the wound badge I do however have some other stuff .A few shots of my Ost items don
    1 point
  40. Here's a newspaper article of the event,
    1 point
  41. Went to this years Blyth Battery Re-enactment Event 2013, took the wife and Grandkids as well Saturday was a washout, Sunday overcast misty and damp but the event went on. And what a Fantastic day was had by all, the crowds flocked to the event, never seen so many people at the event before, Kids encouraged to join in and try things out, here are some of the photo's took on the day.
    1 point
  42. great photos, love the styrene stone wall... very effective machine gun position, pick up and run with it!
    1 point
  43. 1 point
  44. cheers Guys, I've since picked up a mini EK1 and mini WB since that photo was taken, your right a mini Ost would be good too especially if it had some of the other awards attached The third medal is for Austrian veterans of WW2. I still have 2 of his medals these were kept at home and the Russians did not get these.
    1 point
  45. I have to say DAK & Ost are my main interest when it comes to groups. Nice collections lads. Stewy
    1 point

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