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Showing content with the highest reputation on 24/09/20 in all areas

  1. Here is a WW1 era Turkish Grenade, the 1914 No. 2 model. It was a cast iron body with a brass fuse. It had a inscription on the side which translated to "type 2 infantry grenade". Additionally it had a notch on the grenade body to allow for a ring to used to attach to equipment. Like most other Central Powers nations, they relied on Germany to supply their needs, pretty much from 1915 onwards, the Turks were supplied with German made or captured arms and equipment. These No.2 grenades are an interesting and unique model. I have had one on my wish list for some time.
    3 points
  2. Here are a few images of blackout shields used on cars and motorcycles.
    2 points
  3. x Air Force Museum, New Zealand In the Australian War Museum in Canberra (control column. and part of gyro compass) Fur overboots worn by Richthofen on his last flight. Australian War Museum, Canberra In private posession The piece belonged to Wilfrid Reid “Wop” May as he was the last person the famous Red Baron chased. It’s now part of the Royal Alberta Museum’s vast collection of Great War artefacts. Royal Alberta Museum, Canada Imperial War Museum, London
    2 points
  4. Nancy Riedel took over the photo studio from her mother, Mercedes Riedel, who founded the business around 1927, an older and a more recent portrait Various studio photos from Wandsbek that were given to me over the past few years A soldier from Infanterie-Regiment 69 in Wandsbek. An early pre-war photo as can be seen with the cap and other insignia. Identity has unfortunately not been disclosed. A second photo well midwar, depicting the wearer in a tunic which has been made up of a lightweight canvas type material and with a rather individual pattern and with a darkgreen
    2 points
  5. A studio photo of a Husar in full uniform, most likely from Husaren-Regiment Kaiser Franz Joseph von Österreich-Ungarn (Schleswig-Holsteinisches) Nr. 16, based in Schleswig. The uniform jacket and cape are light cornflower blue, noticeable in the photo. Studio is J. Vahlendiek in Schleswig, hardly legible in fine gold print, now very faded, as is the rest of the photo. A re-work using photoshop, contrast raised, now a little more disctinct. Many thanks to wpf.
    2 points
  6. Memorial for Manfred von Richthofen in the park in Schweidnitz, Wallstraße An early post war photo The memorial in it's present day state Belin-Tempelhof, Manfred-von-Richthofen-Straße
    2 points
  7. The 1915 types are somewhat still common, although the 1913 types seem to be prevalent on the market right now. Below is another type, one that I am still searching for. The Germans were somewhat prepared for the war with a reasonable stockpile of Grenades, however this did not last long and so they simplified the 1913 version which is shown below on the right. This was an attempt to reduce production time and get more to the front. These are very uncommon, I have only seen one for sale in the last few years and it was very expensive. Of course after 1915, the stick grenade became dominant and
    2 points
  8. Here is another one of my Kugels, the M1913, really great condition with the bronze traction igniter. Still has markings on the base.
    2 points
  9. Thanks Buster, they are coming out of Eastern Europe mainly if you are lucky to get one, and they are always in dug condition.
    2 points
  10. Two more photos from the photo studio: Studio copy of a snap taken of Adolf Galland and Major Hitgen, Hitgen is second on the left. Signed Adolf Galland and with dedication: Major a.D. Gerd Hitgen in alter Verbundenheit Studio photo of an unknown Leutnant of the Kriegsmarine. Illegible inscription "...gest., 1940" (gestorben, possibly a Narvik casualty)
    2 points
  11. So I'll start this off with Schwere Hand Grenades. Heavy iron often roughly cast grenades produced in many different sizes & styles. Most of these grenades have been salvaged from the Alps I'm lead to believe. My knowledge on them is very limited so feel free to firm up the detail or correct any errors. I just find their 'ugliness' appealing. Starting off with what I think is the oldest in my collection a 'medium' Schwere'. It weighs 10 ounces & would have contained gun powder. It has a delay friction fuse & a fuse protector. Note the uneven body casting & heavy fragmentat
    1 point
  12. Here is a WW1 era Austrian made Zylndergranate, a very simple design, a handle that activated the fuse was locked in place by a pull ring. There are traces of the feld-grau paint on the bottom of the grenade. It is basically an upgraded Lakos type, which was a tube grenade.
    1 point
  13. Here is a Kugel Grenade belt carrier. It is in relic condition and not complete. How it worked was the grenade was secured into the rig, and had leather straps that attached to the studs on the side of the carrier and supported the grenade with a small disc that held the grenade bottom. So to use it, the soldier removed it from the belt, the leather strap was then disconnected, and the grenade was pulled free from the carrier, removing the fuse pin, then the carrier was simply thrown away. Not a very efficient use of materials, so no wonder it was discontinued and from what I found it was not
    1 point
  14. I've got 2 1913 Kugel Grenades with different fragmentation 'patterns'. I'll post photos. Whats the correct fuse for the 1915? (I have 2) Is it the 'wire type? See photo (it is a replica).Excuse my poor terminology and enlighten me please.
    1 point
  15. Nice complete example. Don't see them very often with the handle and pull ring etc. Just the tube capped at both ends.
    1 point
  16. Great piece of ordinance. I dont collect shells etc but I would like a 50 kg plus bomb. There's a bomb off a Stuka on sale over here. £2500 though
    1 point
  17. Nice condition especially the inscription.First time I've heard the translation so nice one. Nice use of an O Ring to sit it on. I had considered that idea for my spherical grenades. Is it yours or is it still on the wishlist? There's one been on sale for ages at a dealers over here but they command top money, £400 is the price but they tend to be around that price. When they do come on the market they get snapped up quickly.Apparently this grenade is often faked but I don't know how good they are. For me if I bought the real deal the inscription would need to be in good condition. On my wish
    1 point
  18. Not come across these grenades. More ordinance for the list.
    1 point
  19. Magzine for MP 38 & 40, dated 1942 with maker's code kur, being Stey-Daimler-Puch, Warschau or Graz Waffenamt Wa815
    1 point
  20. Here is an image off the internet showing the spherical Makedonia type grenades.
    1 point
  21. As Bulgaria was part of the Central Powers during the Great War, it could draw on resources from its partner nations, such as Germany which provided weapons and field gear. Bulgaria also supplied the above mentioned grenades to Turkey. Bulgaria used the German stick type grenades, which can be seen in many photographs. Information on Bulgaria's munition productions is scarce as well as photos of ordnance. I did find that during the Balkan wars, there was a good abundance of grenades available to Bulgarian forces, however in 1915, only a few thousand grenades were available, which tends to supp
    1 point
  22. Here is the Makedonia grenade which was introduced in 1906, which was widely used in the Balkan Wars in 1912-1913. The grenade had a threaded opening for a brass or cast iron plug with knurled bands. Initially, the fuse was a match type which ran through the center of the plug, but was updated in 1911. After the Ordin grenade was introduced, the Makedonia grenades was also fitted with this fuse. The grenade was 72mm in diameter and weighed about 750 grams. Photo source: internet
    1 point
  23. Here is a nice front line photo, although not crisp, shows great details. The man on the far left is wearing the so-called lobster armor, he also has a stick grenade in his left hand and his bayonet troddel is visible as well. The sniper has a troddel as well, and some M1917 stick grenades. The Machine gunner is using the MG 08/15, a lighter, portable version of the MG 08 which weighed 18 kilos (without water in the cooling jacket), versus the MG 08 which weighed 69 kilos minus the 39 kilo mounting sled.
    1 point
  24. Great find on the SIPE, it is really hard to find them with fuses intact, as most are dug examples.
    1 point
  25. Here's an 8 page War Emergency information and instruction pull out leaflet from WW2.
    1 point
  26. Next we have a 2 page leaflet Stay Were You Are issued by the Ministry of Information.
    1 point
  27. Here are images of Civil Defence leaflets 1 & 2 which I don't have in my collection still looking for them.
    1 point
  28. Next we have Civil Defence Food in War-Time 4 page leaflet No 4.
    1 point
  29. Next we have a Civil Defence Evacuation 4 page leaflet No 3 from a set of 5.
    1 point
  30. Here is an interesting item, a WW1 era US Engineer sketching case. It appears almost unused, with all contents present, although the contents have been opened, they are near mint in most case. It even has the original packing list inside. The metal carrying case is olive drab in color with a leather handle, inside is a decal from the McFarlan Motor Co., the maker of the case. A lot of subcontracted work was done in the US during WW1. The tripod is wood and brass, made by the Eastman Kodak Company, dated 1914. Most of the engineer items are made by Kueffel & Esser Co. Most likely this case
    1 point
  31. Some further background info / photos added. A lot of personal regalia also helmets, unforms of Prinz Alfons have been in auctions in the past 20-30 years.
    1 point
  32. Here is a WW1 era US made 75mm high explosive shell and brass casing. The projectile has the original paint, which was yellow, but has faded over the years. The projectile is unfired as evident by the driving band at the base. The US made these shells for the French forces as well as US troops who were using the French 75's. The US did have some of its own artillery, but not much made it overseas, and to ease logistics it made sense to use the French and British pieces already in theater.
    1 point
  33. Upon seeing them, the last body type one is the kind I had, but with the first type fuse/ ingnitor
    1 point
  34. Very nice, I haven't seen one of those carriers for ages,! And that kugel is in remarkable condition, I used to have one also, but not as nice as yours.
    1 point
  35. Impressive decorations! Good stuff Fritz.
    1 point
  36. Here is an item have been looking for for quite some time, they turn up occasionally, but many are either modern copies, or Yugoslav 98 production, a so-called Frog or Frosch for the carrying strap - K.98:
    1 point
  37. Thanks, for all your help! Peter Bellingrath, at Paul Jacobi, said, they had a reproduction, for 29 Euro. Depending, on shipping cost, I may have one turned. Thanks, Again!
    1 point
  38. I know, the outside diameter tapers, just, not sure, how much is hollowed out. Can you shoot a picture, straight down, inside the bell. Thanks
    1 point
  39. Great! The conical or bell shaped end maintains the same thickness, and completely hollow? The 3omm is the the length, of the whole bell? How long, before the taper? Length of threaded portion? Thanks
    1 point
  40. x A replica M.1777 pistol by Hege-Huberti-Pedersoli - this is calibre 0,69 (ca. 17 mm), but lacks the engraving of manufacturer's details. Clearing rod below (bright), and the original clearing rod for the M.1822, this example with a conical or bell shaped end, which is hollow. The end piece has a diametre of 16 mm, total length: 19,6 cm. The bottom end has a screw fitting, as the 1822 model did not have an internal spring to hold the rod, as did earlier models. Diametre of bottom end: ca. 4 mm. Total length of conical part; ca. 30 mm. These measurements are a good approxi
    1 point
  41. Not for sale. I salvaged it from a rather wrecked 1822 pistol purchased in Berlin. The wooden stock had been a complete remake, not quite satisfactory, so I decided to part with it. You can still get these parts here and there, at arms fairs, etc. There are also copy parts available, which are satisfactory, such as by the Italian firm of Pedersoli or by Paul Jacobi in Iserlohn/Germany, he specialises in muzzle loading weapons complete, these are also fireable, they are are of very good quality and complete with all authentic ordonance marks, dates and maker's name, as appropriate. He does a
    1 point
  42. Do you, still, have the ramrod for a French M.1822 pistol, if so, how much? Thanks
    1 point
  43. Freiherr von Pappritz Copies of original photos lent to me nearly 40 years ago. A little old lady who had permission to leave the DDR and settle in the west, told me her story. She was originally born in Wien and she married Freiherr von Pappritz and settled in Dresden. She brought with her, her own personal silver service and some elegant Rococo furniture with royal blue upholstery, which survived through world war 2, the turmoils of the DDR and were brought to the west. They had seen better years. She kindly lent me these photos of her first husband, and explained only, th
    1 point
  44. x Various older copy parts A crudely made brass trigger guard found on a French cavalry An 9 pistol. A crudely forged steel hammer and screw for a flintlock musket, found on a French M.1777 musket, probably of DDR origin or older. A lock spring and hammer screw for French flintlock weapons, made by Pedersoli Italy, simply functional Original musket parts above, mainly from a French M.1777 musket: A 1777 upper stock spring, a sling swivel unknown, and the remains of a damaged sling swivel from a French 1777 musket. Below, a part of a sword hanger, Prussian, la
    1 point
  45. Photos from other sources, purchased a few years back Parade, Fahnenkompanie, Stettin, 1936 (?) Reverse has a pencilled inscription. Regimental flags are of the former II. Armee-Korps, including Pommersches Grenadier-Regiment 2 and Füsilier-Regiment Königin Viktoria von Schweden 34 A one year volunteer of a foot battery of the Prussian Artillery, IX. Armee-Korps, 1860-1870, Photo Atelier Gustav Hanberg, Rendsburg A cabinett photo of a one year volunteer dragoon, said to be of Henning v. Puttkamer, born 1854, thought to be Dragoner-Regt.2 in Schwedt
    1 point
  46. Studio photos, Atelier Mercedes Riedel, Wandsbek A Leutnant of Infanterie-Regiment 16 (Oldenburg), pre-war studio photo A wedding photo of Oberfeldwebel/Oberwachtmeister in early walking-out uniform A portrait that has been printed the wrong way around, left should be right. Early uniform. A Hauptgefreiter of Marineflugabwehrabteilung with his wife, pre-war studio photo Kriegsmarine photo with a dedication to the daughter Leutnant Meyer (?) as an infantry officer wearing the officer's Litewka. He also has the EK and Hanseate
    1 point
  47. Studio photos, Atelier Mercedes Riedel, Wandsbek Early Bundeswehr photo, 1950s or 1960s - "Minensuchgeschwader" Early Bundeswehr photo, 1950s or 1960s. "Leutnant", possibly artillery (colour backing of collar patches) "4th Reich" Bundeswehr manoevre photo from the late 1960s or mid 1970s. They don't look like they could take on the rest of the world. These are "citizens in uniform", as they say nowadays. Noticeable is the outward lack of discipline, and the impression that they just don't have a clue, completely ungerman and unmilitary. Category: "Im
    1 point
  48. A Mündungsschoner für a Gewehr 98 - WW1
    1 point
  49. Another photo of Major Hitgen from the Photo Studio, was given to me today. And another picture of Hitgen with H.-D. Frank, found in internet.
    1 point
  50. Photo received from the old studio today. Depicted is a policeman with 2 boys, one wearing a sidecap. The picture is marked on the reverse: August 1943, Schwabenried, Gau Bayreuth, Oberfranken. Not supposed to disclose the name of those depicted. Pictures were never collected.
    1 point

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