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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/08/19 in all areas

  1. Yes mate, the guns are on my shotgun certificate, it is a smaller cartridge than the normal 12 bore carts
    2 points
  2. Kenny these were done for civilian use
    2 points
  3. Kenny they were originally full bore but at some point re bored to .410
    2 points
  4. I would love a firing Lee Enfield, my dad has a shotgun license. Are they hard to come by I presume? I wish I could own a firing MG42 if I legally could but sadly such weapons would mean serious trouble in the UK, the closest I can get is a de-act or a gas one.
    2 points
  5. Cheers guys they are .410 on a shotgun license, the only thing with that is I will never fire them as a .410, and they are stuck in my cabinet, if they are deactivated tastefully they gain their originality back in some sense and they can be displayed and I can enjoy seeing them displayed as they should be, Mmmm what to do!
    2 points
  6. I would agree with Kenny, if you can legally hold them as they are, then keep them as such.
    2 points
  7. Just to note the rifle came with just a battle sight, by chance I got hold off a flip sight for it (not sure of the right name for it) and that is now fitted. The question now is do I have then deactivated and the plates in the breech removed etc?
    2 points
  8. Here is my WW1 German Luger. It has all matching parts, except for the magazines. Serial Number 5841, made in 1918 at Erfurt. Real nice condition with the bluing covering the majority of the parts. The holster is dated 1911, so not original to this pistol, but it displays well. Very good craftsmanship, well made piece. Still shoots straight to this day.
    1 point
  9. The leather holster could do with some saddle care, especially on the straps, otherwise all will deteriorate in time. I do not recommend using antiques in general, they should be allowed to rest.
    1 point
  10. I am not sure? my knowledge is limited. Ive googled Failsworth Hats and came across some very smart peaky blinder looking caps Established 1903 so more than likely it could be, another name to add to the list
    1 point
  11. An absolutely incredible piece of history & a wonderful story, really appreciate you sharing !
    1 point
  12. Thanks Guys, Yes he was a very brave man, his medals are displayed at the Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum in Glasgow. My Aunt and my Grandmother presented the medals to the City of Glasgow in 1972. The Lord Provost of Glasgow had lunch with them and it was a very special day. Here is a picture of his medals from Museum, the V.C. here is a copy as they keep the original in the safe. Here is also a painting of my Uncle with his Lewis gun by the artist Duncan Brown, he was kind enough to visit us in the shop when he heard I was one of the few relatives still living in Scotland. He has painted al
    1 point
  13. Very nice example and with the frog too! The 39 date on the blade spine is unusual for the period, this is seldom seen. I would think the bayonet has been reconditioned and re-blued at some stage, possibly period done.
    1 point
  14. The No4 Mk.I has a BNP proof mark (nitro), postwar, and a date of 43 on the stock brace, slightly worn or rubbed. I remember in the early 1970s when I got my first rifles, there were no deactivateds then, firms in the UK were offering smooth-bored military rifles for collectors purposes, so then these weapons were converted to smooth bore, under the condition that the collector has a shotgun license. So in those days you had to send your shotgun cert with your order. There were firms in Birmingham and Wolverhampton,etc., who had stocks of WW1, WW2 and earlier weapons under these conditions. C
    1 point
  15. Hi all, I was a lucky man on Friday, I was given two rifles. They are .410 calibre and on my shotgun license. First up is this Lee Enfield No 4 MK1. I have been told it is a 1943 rifle though I cannot find any date stamp
    1 point
  16. 12 bore that's what I was thinking about.I couldn't picture a 303 firing a 12 bore :-) Unusual item, I suppose the Army had more 303's after the war that they knew what to do with, so converting and selling for civilian use would make sense.
    1 point
  17. interesting , I know very little about live guns , so is .410 the standard shotgun calibre ? i.e. the famous shot gun cartriges you see that are red plastic with the brass bit at the end?
    1 point
  18. Do you know why this was done Ben? was it done by the army or were they for civilian use?
    1 point
  19. That's true if they are stuck in your gun cabinet and you have no intention of firing them then you might be better to get them deactiveated. I get guys in the shop all the time who say they have Enfields on there shotgun licence but have never asked them the back ground to these guns. Is this the way they were made or were they originally 303's?
    1 point
  20. I would leave them as they are , can they still fire?
    1 point

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