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kenny andrew    1,393

Any ideas what these are?  They are all Third Reich period, large badges stamped ges.gesch and pins stamped A.Donner Sclechfield. I have found modern versions of these badges on Porches in fact James Deans Porsche Spyder had the exact one on his. They are definitely Third Reich period as were vet bring back with Luftwaffe items. I'm thinking 1930's German Grand Prix team the Silver Arrows? but maybe that's wishful thinking.  

nurburg1.jpg

nurburg2.jpg

 

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kenny andrew    1,393

Here's a picture I found of an exact replica of James Deans Porsche 550 Spyder it sports a more modern version of the badge. Was this badge an award for taking place in the Nurburgring Grand Prix, or even for winning it? I think these badges could be quite good. 

nurburg3.jpg

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Graeme    87

I think it's a badge for those that have driven the Nurburgring. A snippet from European Car Web 

The trip wasn't for nothing, however. During their time in Deutschland the pair made contacts at both RUF and TechArt, which may help with distribution in the future, as well as taking a side trip to the Nurburgring. Astute readers will note the Nurburgring badge attached to the driver's side fender--just like on James Dean's 550 Spyder. To make it official, they drove the circuit in the midst of insane Sunday-afternoon track traffic. Though it's an experience he won't forget, Trindle said he's now sure he doesn't want to be a race car driver.

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Graeme    87

From what I can gather all original badges are marked with the makers name. Adam Donner.

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kenny andrew    1,393

Cheers for the info, so we recon drivers who took part in the race could have the badge on there car? 

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Graeme    87

I don't think you need have taken part in a race. Just driven the circuit. It's open to the public to drive (although I don't know when that started).

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Greg    888

Graeme is correct, anyone can drive it on certain days and they do. Not sure when that started either but TopGear has some segments on it.

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kenny andrew    1,393

I wonder when they started this through ? I can imagine the Third Reich being a bit strict who they let on there track.

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kenny andrew    1,393

equally it is still just as possible through that it was on a car belonging to one of the Mercedes or Auto Union teams ? The items came with a Luftwaffe officers cap which would suggest he was maybe keen on high speeds.

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Reece    47

have you found out what they were yet kenny :huh:

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kenny andrew    1,393

Hi Reece, these are Third Reich Nurburgring badges.These would be affixed to cars which completed a circuit at the Nurburgring race track. The final hurdle we are trying to find out is if these badges were only affixed to racing cars or if the public were also allowed to have them on there cars if they visited and drove on the race track. I am hoping only the racing teams were allowed them but we still have to find evidence of this, would also be nice to find one in a period photo that would probably help too. 

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Greg    888

Try contacting their PR department they should be able to tell you:

Otto-Flimm-Straße

D - 53520 Nürburg

Tel.: +49 (2691) 30 2 - 0

Fax: +49 (2691) 30 2 - 155

pr@nuerburgring.de

http://www.nuerburgring.de

 

The Germans were very keen on everyone driving. Hitler came up with the VW remember to provide a car for the masses. I would not hold out that only racing teams had the badge. However with wartime shortages and restriction I also doubt many went out driving during the Nazi era.

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Reece    47
kenny andrew said:
Hi Reece,

 

these are Third Reich Nurburgring badges.These would be affixed to cars which completed a circuit at the Nurburgring race track.The final hurdle we are trying to find out is if these badges were only affixed to racing cars or if the public were also allowed to have them on there cars if they visited and drove on the race track.

 

I am hoping only the racing teams were allowed them but we still have to find evidence of this, would also be nice to find one in a period photo that would probably help too.

 

Are they rare a period photo would be interesting 

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kenny andrew    1,393

Cheers Greg, I have sent them an email , will let you know how I get on.

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kenny andrew    1,393

As Third Reich badges they are quite rare and nice to have a complete set. If they were only used by Motor Racing teams then they will be even rarer. Hopefully we will get a reply from the Nurburgring PR department and maybe even a wartime photo of one on a car :)

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Reece    47

That would be good :)

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Greg    888
As Third Reich badges they are quite rare and nice to have a complete set.

 

If they were only used by Motor Racing teams then they will be even rarer.

 

Hopefully we will get a reply from the Nurburgring PR department and maybe even a wartime photo of one on a car :)

 

If you do not hear back I can translate your email into German and send it again. Sometimes German's are happy to reply to thing in English. Other times unless it is in German they will never reply.

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kenny andrew    1,393

cheers Greg, I know what you mean we'll give it a week see if they reply 

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kenny andrew    1,393

Got a reply today. 

 

Dear Mr. Kenneth James Andrew, 

the photo in the enclosure that you have send us, shows the historic logo of the Nürburgring and the Nürburgring Ltd.. It was shown on all printed matters / papers (brochures, playbills, tickets, postcards, letterheads), merchandising, etc. Because of this the logo was not lacquer on race cars or anywhere else. Sometimes during the anniversary years the historic logos will be reproduced on merchandising articles etc. 

We hope this could help you in this matter. 

Yours sincerely, 

Simone Bell 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen 

Simone Bell

Teamleiterin Marketing Services

Team Manager Marketing Services 

Nürburgring GmbH

Otto-Flimm-Straße

D-53520 Nürburg

 

So if Simone is correct it looks like they were not on the racing cars , pity still nice badges though :)

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Greg    888

So what you have then should be German Third Reich Era mementos from an anniversary year at the track. Still the track was rather young so not many anniversaries yet and they still could be prized, especially since you have providence for them. 

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kenny andrew    1,393

Yes Greg that is correct because of weight restrictions the badges would not have been used on the silver arrows. Here is a clip of Richard Seaman who won the 1938 Gran Prix at the Nurburgring. There are no badges on the car other than the makers logo. Interestingly Richard Seaman the only British racing driver to drive for Hitler in the Mercedes silver arrows. He was one of the Hitler's favourite drivers, beating his team mate Manfred von Brauchitsch whose  uncle was the famous General, Walther von Brauchitsch.  The Von Brauchitsch car caught fire letting Seaman win the German Gran Prix in 1938.  Seaman was later killed during the 1939 Belgian Gran Prix in which he was winning, just before the outbreak of WW2. He was later buried in London where the largest wreath came from Adolf Hitler. Instead of being regarded as Britain's greatest racing driver, his story was forgotten because of his association with Adolf Hitler.

 

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