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leon21

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leon21 last won the day on August 11

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About leon21

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  • Birthday 21/07/49

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    NORTHUMBERLAND
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    KRIEGSMARINE REGALIA

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  1. Here's an interesting little pocket book I found at a car boot sale at the week end cost me all of £2.00.
  2. My Latest Additions

    Thanks Paul, have not found another brass lapel badge to date.
  3. My Latest Additions

    Yes this was the year they were created through the merger of the 4th ( Royal Irish ) Dragoon Guards with the 7th ( Princess Royal's ) Dragoon Guards. This white metal cap badge was adopted in 1930 and they gained the Royal distinction in 1936. What period do you think the bass ATC lapel badge is from the 1940s or 1950s ?.
  4. My Latest Additions

    Here are three WW2 cap badges. 1st. The 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards, a maroon square backing was worn behind the badge on the general service cap. The regiment's Duplex-Drive tanks were the 1st to land on the beach in Normandy on 6th June 1944. 2nd. The Cheshire Regiment, this badge has an eight-pointed white metal star with a brass acorn and oak leaves at it's centre. There is an all brass version and a light-bronze plastic version issued in 1943. 3rd. The Pioneer Corps, there are two versions of this badge made in brass and white metal, the white metal version was reputedly for those units serving with the Royal Armoured Corps.
  5. My Latest Additions

    Here are two WW1 cap badges. 1st South African Brigade cap badge worn between 1916-1919. 2nd Hertfordshire Regiment a solid brass economy version issued in 1916.
  6. My Latest Additions

    Here are two Air Training Corps Badges. 1st Brass button hole lapel badge, not sure of period this is from. 2nd normal beret badge again not sure of period this is from.
  7. The Allied Victory Medals

    This is a page from the book British Campaign Medals 0f the First World War by Peter Duckers. Section Allies and Enemies some Foreign Campaign Medals. Opinions is the Author completely wrong or does he know something that nobody else knows ?.
  8. The Allied Victory Medals

    No Paul, these are only examples for anybody who have not seen them. Below are four more. 1st The Brazil Medal. 2nd The Romania Medal. 3rd The Italy Medal. 4th The Greece Medal. The only one I have not found is an example of the Spanish Medal.
  9. The Allied Victory Medals

    Here are the next four medals. 1st The French Medal. 2nd The Portugal Medal. 3rd The Siam ( Thailand ) Medal. 4th The Japanese Medal.
  10. It was agreed at Versailles at the end of the war that the Allies would award a standardised Victory Medal to their own personnel, each awarding basically the same medal to their forces. Below are examples of the medals produced by the Allied Nations. 1st The American Medal. 2nd The Cuban Medal. 3rd The Belgium Medal. 4th The Czechoslovakian Medal.
  11. I've all ways liked these medals here's one I have a Third Class gilded bronze with red case and outer cardboard case which has a waxy feel to it. And an image of the Second Class both sides the inscription translates in English as ( For Merit In The Red Cross ) and W.R. and A.V. Translate in English as ( William Rex and Augusta Victoria ). And an image of a advert for the three classes of medals by J.Godet & Sohn.
  12. Happy Birthday Leon

    Thanks Guys.
  13. Happy Birthday Leon

    Thanks guy's.
  14. Not seen one like that before, could it have belonged to a Hitler Youth ( Flak-Helper ) ?.
  15. One for Fritz

    Interesting photo's Paul, yes the author is South African the book is mostly about the men of the South African Brigade. and the sacrifice they paid. The German orders were in their determination to hold on to the wood ( That the enemy was not to advance except over dead bodies ). The British orders were to ( Hold at all costs).
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